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Ken-
Call the office- 1
No doubt all the SUVs traveling throught the 14th century were the cause of that warming period, too? Face it, we all need to be better stewards of this planet but when looking at statistical data over the last century there has only been an increase of 1 degree in average temp readings during that time. I'm not saying we shouldn't make an effort in cleaning our air, but the Earth's atmosphere is resilient and obsorbs the CO2 like the seas obsorb the oil that seeps from the ocean floors.- 2
Due to your unwillingness to deal with the critical environmental issue of our lifetimes, I must offically cancel my insurance with your black-hearted agency.

Now where's the number for that cute little lizard....

PS: 1 - I called your office. You didn't answer.
2 - I called your cell. You didn't answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Original Article:
2008 Literbike Shootout: ZX-10R vs CBR1000RR vs GSX-R1000 vs YZF-R1

Please discuss the Motorcycle.com article 2008 Literbike Shootout: ZX-10R vs CBR1000RR vs GSX-R1000 vs YZF-R1 in our Motorcycle Forums below. Use the reply button to let others know your comments or feedback on the article. Constructive criticism is always appreciated, along with your thoughts and personal opinions on the bikes and products we have tested.
 

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Kevin- for shyts and giggles why don't you call Larry Pegram and Erion Racing and get a Infenion test of their FX bikes. Get Larry and Jake to do the pro thing and then take a couple of guys from the office and trade off the bikes and get your impressions. Bet you'd have fun. You have 9 days to pull this together- you can do it. They'll be testing after the races so you could probably squeeze that in.
That would be fun, and we'd love to do it. But Pete, Fonz and I are currently immersed in raging debate about global warming.
 

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And what about the Boss Hoss cripple bike test for yours truly? Can we only dream?
 

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Pete Speaketh

Shame about the 1098, it seems to be doing very well in the on track comparisons, not sure how it would do on a street comparison? Pete, have you ridden them both? What sayeth you?
Having ridden the 1098 (and1098S and 1098R), I can sayeth that if we had a 1098 during this comparo, it would have created some serious grief for the Big Four. It is an incredible motorcycle(s), and in my very humble opinion, possibly the best sportbike --at least big bore-- of the last 10 years, maybe? Though a similar argument could be made for the 675 Trumpet.

Factor out MSRPs and the 1098 may have been numero uno, though the CBR could give it a good run. The 1098, for as performance-driven as it is, is surprisingly comy, and like the CBR, would only require one or two aftermarket mods to make it even more comfortable.

I prefer the linear power of a Twin and the tractable-ness that most offer. Of the Big Four, the '08 CBR1000RR is closest to that quality and has what is roughly a 10-15 hp advantage depending on who, what, where, when, etc does dyno testing. Conversely, the Duc probably only makes 4 or 5 ft-lbs more than the CBR, but the Duc reaches peak torque much earlier in its L-Twin powerband. To me, that is a far more meaningful factor if we allow that all of these bikes will be ridden on the track and street.

Some deride the maintenance costs and intervals of a Ducati despite the Italian bike maker's leaps of improvement in that area. But pondering this very issue the other day while riding, I concluded two things: Anyone who can pony up 16 large for a 1098 can probably afford the service; or if you'll burn through the miles so fast that service intervals surface quickly, learn how to do the work yourself. Or at least most of it to defray as much cost as possible. Even though it was only ever on used UJMs, it only took me one $600 service bill to figure out that I was doing all future work myself --save for tire changes. And that's just what I did for hundreds of thousands of miles. What once seemed like going where no man had gone before, became an annoying routine after only a year or so.

Plug MSRP back into the equation and the 1098 would take a serious hit in that category. But even losing a lot of ground in that respect, and being down on peak hp, I don't think that those particular scores would have dragged the Duc down far enough to knock it out of what I imagine would be first place.

Still, at almost $4,300 more than the most expensive bike in this test, the 1098's retail is a weighty issue.

Again, playing the pro/con game, looking at everything else like cool factor, grin factor, suspension, brakes, handling, tranny, fit/finish, etc and all that those categories take into account, I still say the 1098 would've topped the charts.

But, in case you haven't noticed, I haven't spoken for anyone else involved in this crazy comparo; it is simply my speculation and opinion. And, really, it means nil since, well, we never had the Ducati anyway. :(
 

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Some deride the maintenance costs and intervals of a Ducati despite the Italian bike maker's leaps of improvement in that area. But pondering this very issue the other day while riding, I concluded two things: Anyone who can pony up 16 large for a 1098 can probably afford the service; or if you'll burn through the miles so fast that service intervals surface quickly, learn how to do the work yourself. Or at least most of it to defray as much cost as possible. Even though it was only ever on used UJMs, it only took me one $600 service bill to figure out that I was doing all future work myself, save for tire changes. And that's just what I did for hundreds of thousands of miles. What once seemed like going where no man had gone before, became an annoying routine after only a year or so.
Firstly, thanks for the very complete response -- really rounds out the discussion for me. Secondly, this is the same conclusion I came to after realizing just how quickly I was putting miles on the Aprilia. If my inference is correct then, like you when you reached this decision point, wrenching is a new frontier for me. I have both tools and skills to acquire before I can dive into the meatier stuff but I'm committed to learning to do the majority of maintenance myself.
 

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Firstly, thanks for the very complete response -- really rounds out the discussion for me. Secondly, this is the same conclusion I came to after realizing just how quickly I was putting miles on the Aprilia. If my inference is correct then, like you when you reached this decision point, wrenching is a new frontier for me. I have both tools and skills to acquire before I can dive into the meatier stuff but I'm committed to learning to do the majority of maintenance myself.
Maintenance, eh? First get a good metric socket set with 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 inch drives. Six point sockets. Six point sockets are your friends. Then you can buy tools as you go. I made a point of buying a tool every payday years ago. Now I have a pretty good selection. Some of them I actually use. Never ever ever buy cheap tools. May as well throw your $ away. Craftsman is okay. Not as good as they used to be but you can replace any broken one at Sears for free.
 

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Thanks for the advice. I intended to get a basic set from Sears to start with and slowly but surely replace them with snap-ons. Of course I'm going to have to go metric rather than standard... euro-bike and all.
 
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