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Original Article:
2009 Suzuki TU250X Review

Please discuss the Motorcycle.com article 2009 Suzuki TU250X Review in our Motorcycle Forums below. Use the reply button to let others know your comments or feedback on the article. Constructive criticism is always appreciated, along with your thoughts and personal opinions on the bikes and products we have tested.
 

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MODERATOR X
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Now THAT is a motorcycle. Dig those 1971 rear shocks, Suzuki must have a warehouse full somewhere in downtown Nagata. Wonder if they are still filled with fish oil? Nothing like the damping qualities of a healthy codfish.
 

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I rode the TU for the first time yesterday. What a riot! Its shocks aren't bad, perhaps an upgrade from fish oil to whale oil. Happy to report that wheelies are part of its repertoire.
 

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Very thorough review Pete! I just knew from the minute I saw that bike it was a winner. Everything about it just works. What an excellent choice for a starter bike, or for a tooling around town bike. It's gratifying to read such a glowing review for such a clean and straightforward machine. I particularly liked how you related it to the UJM; an excellent metaphor indeed!
 

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"The term Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM) coined decades ago described the numerous standard-style, and remarkably similar, bikes coming from Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha starting in the 1970s."

Remarkably similar? If Honda 750 epitomizes this thing, how close clones were really Kawi 750 (3 cyl 2-stroke), Suzuki 500 (2-cyl 2-stroke), Suzuki 750 (3-cyl, 2-stroke water cooled), Yamaha 650 (2-cyl 4-stroke) etc? Unlike today, you could pretty much distinguish them even by the sound.

- cruiz-euro
 

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The Toad
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"The term Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM) coined decades ago described the numerous standard-style, and remarkably similar, bikes coming from Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha starting in the 1970s."

Remarkably similar? If Honda 750 epitomizes this thing, how close clones were really Kawi 750 (3 cyl 2-stroke), Suzuki 500 (2-cyl 2-stroke), Suzuki 750 (3-cyl, 2-stroke water cooled), Yamaha 650 (2-cyl 4-stroke) etc? Unlike today, you could pretty much distinguish them even by the sound.

- cruiz-euro
Good point. You could easily tell a KZ1000/Z-1 from a CB750F or a GS1000 at a glance. Good luck today trying to tell a CBR600 from an R6. Or a Shadow from a Vulcan without staring at them for a while.
 

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Cool bike, it's about time we started seeing decent all-around bikes here again. trust Suzuki to come up with it.
 

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"The term Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM) coined decades ago described the numerous standard-style, and remarkably similar, bikes coming from Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha starting in the 1970s."

Remarkably similar? If Honda 750 epitomizes this thing, how close clones were really Kawi 750 (3 cyl 2-stroke), Suzuki 500 (2-cyl 2-stroke), Suzuki 750 (3-cyl, 2-stroke water cooled), Yamaha 650 (2-cyl 4-stroke) etc? Unlike today, you could pretty much distinguish them even by the sound.

- cruiz-euro
We knew at least one of you malcontents would comment on this. You cherry picked the dissimilar bikes from the early '70s rather than note the similar ones (inline-Fours) a little later on:

- Kawi Z1, KZ650, KZ750, Z1000
- Suzuki GS550, GS750, GS850, GS1000.
- Honda CB350, CB400, CB550, CB750
- Yamaha was the most independent thinking, but it still had bikes like the XS1100, FJ600 and Radian, plus 550, 650, 750 and 900cc four-cylinder models.

If there wasn't a lot of common elements in the '70s and '80s, then why are we all familiar with the term UJM?
 

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Nice bike. I could see myself owning one of these someday. Comfortable, nice looking and only a little over 300 pounds. Seems to have decent performance from that little single too. There are rumors that Triumph is/was working on a 500cc bike in this vein. That would interest me.
 

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Love to see a scramble version of this bike. I'd pay $200 more for high pipes and slightly longer suspension. It'd be a great camp ground toy.
 

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We knew at least one of you malcontents would comment on this. You cherry picked the dissimilar bikes from the early '70s rather than note the similar ones (inline-Fours) a little later on:

- Kawi Z1, KZ650, KZ750, Z1000
- Suzuki GS550, GS750, GS850, GS1000.
- Honda CB350, CB400, CB550, CB750
- Yamaha was the most independent thinking, but it still had bikes like the XS1100, FJ600 and Radian, plus 550, 650, 750 and 900cc four-cylinder models.

If there wasn't a lot of common elements in the '70s and '80s, then why are we all familiar with the term UJM?
And things differ today, how?
 

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Too shallow oil pan

We knew at least one of you malcontents would comment on this. You cherry picked the dissimilar bikes from the early '70s rather than note the similar ones (inline-Fours) a little later on:

- Kawi Z1, KZ650, KZ750, Z1000
- Suzuki GS550, GS750, GS850, GS1000.
- Honda CB350, CB400, CB550, CB750
- Yamaha was the most independent thinking, but it still had bikes like the XS1100, FJ600 and Radian, plus 550, 650, 750 and 900cc four-cylinder models.

If there wasn't a lot of common elements in the '70s and '80s, then why are we all familiar with the term UJM?
I get your drift. If we think of UJMs as inline-4 Japanese they are very similar. But if the definition of UJM is any Japanese from -70s the correct term surely is "amazingly different".

... and we must add to the list the key players Gold Wing (4-cyl 4-stroke boxer) and Yamaha XS750 (3-cyl 4-stroke). Who could ever forget the howling noise of the three-winged Yammie abruptly ending up in a complete engine meltdown due to too shallow oil pan?

- cruiz-euro
 

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Awesome little bike.

I knew this bike would be a hit. If it could be modified like a Royal Enfield with the Cafe kit and others, it could become very popular among people who would like to customize it. Although it does look nice now.
 

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California Certification?

Darned CA emissions strike again. I liked this bike when I first saw it... but then again, I actually bought a GB500 new back in the day and later got a W650 so I am definitely a fan of simple light-weight bikes and have a soft spot for spoked wheels.

Given the bike's fuel injection, is the lack of CARB certification really a question of emissions or a cost-saving move on the part of Suzuki due to the cost of testing?
 

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Darned CA emissions strike again. I liked this bike when I first saw it... but then again, I actually bought a GB500 new back in the day and later got a W650 so I am definitely a fan of simple light-weight bikes and have a soft spot for spoked wheels.

Given the bike's fuel injection, is the lack of CARB certification really a question of emissions or a cost-saving move on the part of Suzuki due to the cost of testing?
The usual issue for Cali certification is evaporative emissions. I'd expect Suzuki to bolt on a charcoal canister soon so it can sell these in the country's biggest market.
 

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Evap emissions

The usual issue for Cali certification is evaporative emissions. I'd expect Suzuki to bolt on a charcoal canister soon so it can sell these in the country's biggest market.
I do have to laugh a bit at those charcoal canisters on bikes. Their purpose is to capture evaporative emissions while the tank is being filled with gas, yet I've yet to find a motorcycle gas tank that can accomodate the filler neck from a gas pump. It's usually necessary to hold the California emissions "bellows" device up with one hand to switch the pump on... thus leaving a gap between the pump and the tank and negating the benefit of the evaporative controls system. Am I missing something here?
 

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I do have to laugh a bit at those charcoal canisters on bikes. Their purpose is to capture evaporative emissions while the tank is being filled with gas, yet I've yet to find a motorcycle gas tank that can accomodate the filler neck from a gas pump. It's usually necessary to hold the California emissions "bellows" device up with one hand to switch the pump on... thus leaving a gap between the pump and the tank and negating the benefit of the evaporative controls system. Am I missing something here?
Just because you put the cap on the tank, doesn't mean the fuel has stopped evaporating.
 
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