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would there be a good place to maybe start a thread on this, the seller, is a top seller on ebay, and says hes sold many of these for 500's thats what he has it listed as fitting, and assures me that they have been put on these bikes since thet came out, and its an upgrade from the 130. i just want to ask some one with a 500 ninja to get their input
 

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would there be a good place to maybe start a thread on this, the seller, is a top seller on ebay, and says hes sold many of these for 500's thats what he has it listed as fitting, and assures me that they have been put on these bikes since thet came out, and its an upgrade from the 130. i just want to ask some one with a 500 ninja to get their input
Here's a forum thread about tires at ex-500.com: Kawasaki Ninja EX500 Tire Size Chart ●●● Submit Your Review! ●●●

Lots of differing opinions, so read carefully. Trusting a seller on eBay seems like a dubious plan. Looks like fitting a 140/70 isn't a problem, but a 150 can have clearance issues. Like I said, putting a fatter tire on a narrow rim significantly changes how it sits on the rim, and that definitely has an effect on the tire's characteristics, turn-in response and the tire's overall diameter.
 

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i just want to ask some one with a 500 ninja to get their input
Go with the input of the engineers who designed your bike. They spent serious time and effort figuring out the best size tires for it, and matching all the components like suspension, swingarm, etc. to make it all work together.
 

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Go with the input of the engineers who designed your bike. They spent serious time and effort figuring out the best size tires for it, and matching all the components like suspension, swingarm, etc. to make it all work together.
Uh, No - they didn't. The entire bike is a parts-bin bike, from inception in the '80s to present-day, essentially unchanged (except for a disc rear brake added for the '94MY).

The frame has a hinge in the middle of it, the transmission has been plagued by problems Kawasaki was aware of before the '90s, the crankshaft was (literally!) never "designed" for the stresses of a twin - they just essentially cut-off two cylinders from the inline-four the engine is derived-from. It is under-damped, under-sprung, and under-braked.

In essence, it is a miracle it works as a moto at all; the success of the EX500 owes far more to chance and happy circumstance than "Engineering".

Still, I am glad Kawasaki continues to make them.

Put the 140 on it. It will change the handling a little, but you'll get used to it quickly, unless you are the world's worst rider.

Avoid the 150 unless you absolutely need the availability of race-tires in that size (you don't, not on the street).

But then, if you're racing one, you're probably going to put an older ZX-6 swingarm and front-suspension (and wheels) on the bike anyway.
 

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No, they didn't. What, you think you some kind of "Jedi", waving you hands around like that?
"These are not the tires you are looking for."

Setting aside Kawi's engineering for a moment, what possible good comes from from deviating from ANY bike manufacturer's tire recommendation aside from maybe making the bike look better? This bike isn't going to pull 1.2 g's on the track. He might as well have the quicker handling of the narrower tire.
 

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"These are not the tires you are looking for."

Setting aside Kawi's engineering for a moment, what possible good comes from from deviating from ANY bike manufacturer's tire recommendation aside from maybe making the bike look better? This bike isn't going to pull 1.2 g's on the track. He might as well have the quicker handling of the narrower tire.
A 140 Shinko on the rear (coupled with a mating 110 front) made it feel MUCH more "secure" in corners than the stock craptastic tires it came with.

It seems counter-intuitive, but it actually helped the bike to not push like a pig vs. the "stock" 130. I think it was the slightly-taller profile - and the tire was a bit more "rounded" in cross-section vs. the flatter, cruiser-ish 130 'Stone that came on it.

That it looks better - just a bonus.

I'm glad Kawasaki is still producing the EX500 - but I REALLY wish they would pull a few more suspension parts out of the bin (from say a late-'90s ZX-600 or something) and freshen-up the styling a bit. Without EFI to knock-down emissions, the EX's days ARE numbered, though.
 

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shinkos is what i plan to get i can get the 130and 110 for 125 or so, first i'll do the 130 then a 140, since i haven't been riding the bike i will stick with stock first most likely.
Suit yourself. I'm just sayin' that if the tire you want comes in a 140 but not a 130 - don't be "afraid" of putting one on the bike. I would avoid the 150 (even though many have used them on the EX wheel).

I put the 140 on originally because the 130 wasn't available - and did not regret it.
 

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haha well its 10 bucks more and you are very convincing maybe i will since for me i don't know how it rides with a 130 it really wouldn't matter, how about if anything happens you buy me a new tire haha
 

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haha well its 10 bucks more and you are very convincing maybe i will since for me i don't know how it rides with a 130 it really wouldn't matter, how about if anything happens you buy me a new tire haha
Regardless of which size you put on the bike - the Shinko is a good tire (at least the ones I used were good). It might not be a Dunlop or Bridgestone sport-compound radial, but it's a better tire than the (at the time I had an EX) Bridgestone bias-ply tires that came on the bike.
 

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Back on topic:

MotorCyclistWorld named the Ninja 1000 Motorcycle of the Year (sorry, I can't tell MotorCyclist and Cycle World apart anymore). They said it won because it's an extremely competent bike that can do almost everything, at a cost that is rational in today's economy.

I think that's a good call. Riders these days are less interested in which bikes "shave" 3 lbs. off last years weight and more interested in which bikes "save" $5,000 or more. They're also more likely to look for a bike that can meet two or three riding scenarios vs. a highly focused, single-purpose bike.
 
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