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AMEN !!! Newer Bikes are a pleasure to ride up to 90% with little or no real feed back. (read smooth)



At 91% this ='s GOing WAY fast enough to enjoy, then panic, fall and pain.



If it's more about knee draggin' ... get and older honda F(2or3) or EX500. You have more feedback up to their limits and you won't get the crap scared out of when the newer bikes START to give you the feed back.



When you can drag the pegs more than half way through the turns, only then would I consider trading up.



In italics, the post DID say NOVICE not NEWBIE.



I think a newbie should start out with a dual purpose or trail variety ... starting out on grass and move up to the harder sufaces.
 

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anyone who can't enjoy a GS500E

has no business being on a sportbike. I love fast bikes, and can still (or especially) appreciate a GS500E because it feels like I'm wringing something out of it, instead of it wringing something out of me. It corners well enough, despite the way soft suspension, and the weight and size makes it fun. If he "hated" it, then he probably never learned to corner. And by the way, I'm huge and still don't sweat the power when I ride a GS500, so don't give me that "6ft and 200lbs" crap because I got you beat.
 

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you suck

a bike is a bike. Maybe you think bikes are just toys. You'll probably sell yours tomorrow for a jetski anway. The steering geometry isn't that different. It takes more "effort" to steer it quick. Fer gawds sake what do you want, power steering? So it's not a sport bike. The only thing wrong with it is the styling, and that's subjective. If you want to find real fault with it, the cornering clearance sucks, but so what. It's just a plain basic motorcycle, good transportation, a bit slow. For a beginner it's a good bike. Bring me one of em and I'll show you how to turn.
 

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The Buell Blast is NOT a bad beginners bike - great from 20-45 MPH. Especially Fun around Town. It is NOT a Sportsbike though. And if the Rider has Funds - the Ducati M620/750 is a good trade-up bike. But this is assuming that the person is NOT price-concious! I like 'Standard' position bikes though...
 

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I have been riding for over 30 years and learned to ride on a 50 cc Honda step through with auto clutch. (I presently own a BSA 441 Victor, Norton 850, ZX-6E Kawasaki, ZXR250 Kawasaki, ZX-12R Kawasaki, Triumph 750 TSS, ZZR400 Kawasaki and a Yamaha Riva 180 scooter.) Choose a motorcycle that is a little softer than a full bore 600 sport bike for the start. A ZX-6E Kawasaki is powerful, fast, comfortable and an excellent daily driver. Used ones are 3-4,000 in good shape and it is a great bike for two as well as by yourself.



A good dual sport bike like a Kawasaki KLR-650 would be a good start or a Honda F-3/Katana 600/SV-650 Suzuki. Any bike will do well if you have good tires, good maintenance and practice riding it a lot. MSF classes are a great idea, as is riding in the dirt on a dirt bike. I believe the current level of sport bikes are so highly tuned that a second level bike like an older generation 600 or so is a better choice.



Forget image, look for comfort and a good fit for your body on the bike. If it is like a torture rack you won't enjoy riding it.
 

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I am 20 yrs old now.... I started out on a 1980 kawi 440... and loved it, but i began to feel like i was getting good... I was 16 at the time... then BOOM i smashed it up... not o0nce, not twice but three times.... then i got a little timid and rode like a normal person=(old people who post here) gradually i got my confidence back... from here i moved up to an 82 cb900FF... SMASHED this one right into a tree and scred the ***** out of my parents... same deal, i rode and rode and acquired some more confidence... after a year i bought a new R6( at this point i had thousands of miles of riding experience) I had owned that bike for a long time, and i had never been down and learned to use the performance and powerwhen safe to do so( if that is possible on an r6 doing a wheelie) the bottom line is that i learned to be careful with a motorcycle and to respect its power because i had remembered all the horrific close calls. I presently just bought a 2002 Busa and the thing is a monster... it'll come up into a roll-on wheelie at 2 grand in first... UNREAL... but my 99 R6 was really fast above 7 grand also. Bottom line is that any 600 sport bike has the ability to kill you, as does any motorcycle, but a modern 600 is unbelievable, so be VERY careful... IF I HAD LISTENED TO THE OLD SLOUCHES i could have saved thousands of dollars in repairs on bikes and had a lot less road rash.... As a novice... RESPECT THE POWER and ride as reposible as your age will aloow and always remember that the bike will hurt you if u dont respect it. GET THE 600 U love if u like these type of bikes.... TRUST ME... RESPECT THE POWER
 

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I own a 2001 600R. It has comfortable ergos, and very good performance. The only thing that I don't like about it is that the aftermarket companies don't make to many accesories that fit this bike.
 

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Wow.... 600 too much, not too much.... So many people missing the point. It's all down to you. I know people that are not comfortable driving my Isuzu Trooper but will happily drive a Nissan Sentra for hours.



I guess I mean if you have the personality for a sports bike, then go get a sports bike.



As far as a 600 being a good beginner sports bike, tosh! It's a great bike for any level if you have the right attitude. I opened my throttle on the freeway to the stops the first time the other day, I was in fourth gear and almost scared myself silly and was well into ###mph before hitting the red line. And I had two more gears to go and was grinning like an idiot. (02 Triumph 600TT for anyone who wants to know) but I am pretty sure a really good rider on a 500 could leave me in the dust in the twisties and I have been riding off and on since 96'



Also a word on the CMSP beginner course. I recently took this with my wife just because. And I learned stuff! Well worth the time.



A great 600 bike for a beginning sport rider that you won't get bored of quickly is one that folks always overlook, a Yamaha 600R. It's downright friendly and reliable, my first bike!



Still, like so many people say, if an R6 or something equally radical is what you want AND you give it a decent test ride and still want it, then get it. Just do us all a favor and have the common sense and bravery to admit it's too fast and try something a little less frantic if thats your feeling after the test ride. Unless your comfortable on one of these machines, chances of an accident are that much higher.



Best of Luck!
 

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Well, and let's not forget to upgrade the muffler bearings when changing out the blinker fluid. Everyone always thinks they can let it slide, but a good set of CrMo muffler bearings makes all the difference in those long low corners.
 

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Re: insurance

I dont really think you were being flamed there, but that was good advise. I had a EX500 and a not so great driving record, I only paid $250 a year on it through Progressive.
 

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I started on a Ninja 250 (don't all laugh, we have to start somewhere). It gave me a good handle on how the bikes react, shifting, clutch, and just being on the road. After discovering I liked riding, I sold it for EXACTLY what I paid for it. Then I bought an F4, great bike, until a 16 yr old girl turned in front of me. Now I have a Ducati 748..



Bottom line?



Work your way up, know that you like the sport before you spend the loot. Your not going to go out and buy a set of expensive golf clubs if you've never played.
 

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My only thought is that twenty years ago anyone that rode a 600 or 650 was not a "man". That has all changed. Because either

the weight to hp ratio has changed or I have gotten wimpy as I've aged. Ride that 600 with the pride you would have exhibited

 

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I'll have to agree with you on this one... I just bought my first bike this spring, and after looking at lots of 600 sport bikes, I found a nice 91 EX500. The price was unbeatable, and the bike was in perfect condition. I am already contemplating a bigger bike, but don't plan on selling the EX. Its just a blast to ride, and I'm not worried about having to shell out lots of cash to repair it if (I mean when) I lay it down.



 

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I'm 22 and I just bought my 4th bike, a new ZX6R. I started with an 82 Nighthawk 6 years ago and I hated it. It was tired, old, and looked it as well. That said, I learned a lot while my friends were busy crashing their CBRs. My second bike was an EX500, and I just got rid of my SV650 of 2 years. There's a fairly obvious progression that you can see, and I can't recommend something similar to you enough.

Go buy a tired old dog of a bike, ride the hell out of it for 6 months, and you will learn so much more. Who cares if you tip it over, or even if you dump it in a turn? It's probably gonna run, and it won't cost you more than a few hundred bucks to fix it. Everyone drops a bike sooner or later. Maybe only in the driveway, but you will drop it. Took me 5 years before I did, but it happened.

When/If you decide that motorcycling is something you're genuinely interested in, take the MSF course and upgrade. Your old rat bike will still be worth almost what you paid assuming it's running and in alright shape, because they basically quit depreciating after about 12 - 15 years. It won't kill you to spend 6 months on something you don't like, but there's good chance that a newer 600 will.
 

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I agree-Look at the performance numbers of modern-600's. In many cases, they surpass the specs of factory racers 25 years ago. I'm not sure any of the 600's could be considered "starter" bikes. Oh sure, we tell ourselves "I'll just not get into the meat of the motor". Right. You're going to get the bike, you're going to ride it "responsibly" for maybe 200 miles, then you're going to wick it up, and more than likely you will not die. Problem is- the more times to do it, the more you convince yourself you have the experience to handle all that power- until one day you get into a corner too hot.. freak out ... jam the brakes... stand it up and go right into whatever obstacle your wide-eyes are staring at. I'm not saying the same thing can't happen on a beginner-bike, but chances are you'll not be going hyper-velocity and have even odds you'll pull through with perhaps only a pee-pee wet spot (and a great lesson-learned). I've riden bikes for over 30 years. The more I ride, the more I realize how bad (and lucky) I was when I started. Thank G that the definition of bad-ass bike in my day was a CB750 (bought it) I love the 600 repli-raceres. If I had a track in my back yard, I'd own one. Just seems a little excessive for what 100% of newbie riders are using them for. If you do choose to get Gxxr/R6/etc, go all the way and buy a matching Cigarette boat and a Hummer. Chicks dig those too. :)
 

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Re: turn signal fluid

Dude- get with the program! I bought a permaplex dispigulator purge canister- I don;t even worry about my turn signal fluid anymore! My next hop up will be the carbon-flux-moon rock disc-brake pads. What a dinosaur you are!
 

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Yeah, I got a VFR after riding a series of naked bikes for years. I learned the hard way, that you need to reprogram your internal computer to take note of the fact that you're going a lot faster than your ears and fanny tell you. Every step up involves a readjustment in your thinking, or you will find yourself badly overcooking a corner. My VFR is way better than I, and 99% of the riders out there, will ever be. There are certainly faster bikes out there, but I don't think it would make any difference. I have a friend who has and RC51, and I know for a fact that he is at least as fast as I am, probably faster. It don't make a damn bit of difference on public roads, cause you can only go so fast, and contiunue to exist as a viable carbon based life form
 

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I must admit, I think a 600cc sport bike (say 97 and newer) is really not a good idea to learn on.



They take a lot of skill. Sure you can ride slow and they are very stable, but the fact is they arent very forgiving. A small mistake with your right hand can get you in a lot of trouble even at low speed. And lets face it, new riders ARE ham-fisted. Hell, a lot of old riders can be too!



Seriously, although it would be cool to do otherwise, Id suggest you buy a cheap, non-cutting-edge bike, ride it for a while, make your mistakes on it where a slightly over-enthusiastic right hand leads to a slight jar in braking or a bump of acceleration...not you sliding along the road.



Same thing when your foot slips for the first time when you put it down whilst stopped filling up or at an intersection. You learn the hard way when you ride. Delaying that shiny bike for a few months may just be a good idea...and you will tell yourself that if you are unlucky enough to drop your bike. And from memory the statistics are that you are more likely than not to drop your bike in the first year.



Then when you feel like you need more, upgrade to a newer, sportier bike, if thats your desire. Even if you only own the slower bike for a few months if thats all it takes you to feel comfortable, its still a VERY wise thing to do. Those first few months will be some of your highest risk...not just of dropping the bike, but of killing yourself as well.



Even if you ride carefully and have strict control on your desire to go fast, the one thing you cant control is that sh1t happens. You will make mistakes. And a more foregiving bike may be the difference between a sudden bump while you ride, and the bike going down hard.





















 
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