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Geeheezuz, I thought stuff like that only happens to me...



Scream to the service manager, if he doesn't help, go up the chain of command, even to the manufacturer of bikes they represent. Write letters, send email, etc.



Way back in the stone age Glendale Honda rebuilt my 1971 CB350. Except they overbored one of the cylinders wrong, 40 over vs. 20. Made horrible piston-slap noises. The service manager said, and I quote "they all make that noise".



To make a long story short I had Glendale Honda rebuild it again, and they cut me a 50% discount off the price. They got it right the second time.



Then there was the time Glendale Honda left the air cleaner element out of my new '83 XL600R. Needless to say I don't use Glendale Honda much anymore.



Good luck.



 

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They added two quarts of oil and then more when it returned to the dealership? I've never had a bike hold more than four qts of oil, most are closer to three.



They definitely forgot to add oil and if the bike started making noises, there was a lot of metal making contact in the motor after a mile of running. I'd drain the oil and check for metal in the oil and on any of the magnetic drain plugs. But, with 42k on the clock you may have to negotiate a major discount on a new bike!
 

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Everyone makes mistakes. They should just be glad the engine didn't seize, throwing your wife in front of a bus. They need to realize they dodged a big bullet here. They then need to bite the little bullet and do either of MO's recommendations mentioned above. If I owned the shop I buy the bike from you at its fair market value.
 

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The Toad
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Tigercub is right. Check for metal shavings in the oil. But even if you don't find any it's pretty sure that the engine has received severe damage somewhere. The only way to be sure is a complete teardown. I'd certainly not trust the bike to go anywhere until it is fully inspected internally.



The problem is... do you want to trust the same dealer to fix the problem who caused it?



Many years ago I met an ex-bike mechanic who used to work for Torrance Honda. He said he quit because of the shoddy maintenance and corrupt tactics. An example was a totally worn out visibly smoking 305 Scrambler that the dealer took on trade. They thickened up the oil with copious amounts of STP and sold it to some sucker.



So ya gotta be really careful about dealers. Many are just crooks. Many are honest, too. I like to check out dealerships during lunch. If the mechanics are smoking dope in the back you are in trouble.
 

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The Toad
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Some use a lot more. The air/oil cooled Zookis use over 5 quarts. I know, it costs me $30 in Mobil1 every time I change it.



Also, dry sump engines can get away with less oil without damaging anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Versus what? Chug-a-lugging Mickeys Big Mouths?



Being a bike mechanic is tough. Lots of stress. I’ve found that ingesting a big fat doobie, or a couple 24 ouncers of Old English behind the shop frees up the decision making processes when faced with a horribly complicated task, say like adjusting the valves on an R1. Instead of saying to yourself "Oh Christ, now I’ve got to take out the camshaft " you actually look forward to it, and have a good time doing it. But count those shims afterwards.



Also cuts down on the cursing and tool-throwing, mostly because you don’t want the service manager to smell your breath.

 

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I think for some of us - mostly old Brit bike riders - the only assurance you have of total control over bike maintenance and repair is to own one type of bike and get to know it thouroughly. The old pushrod Brit bikes don't count much for performance today, although they are as much fun as any bike, but you can do everything yourself and with the occasional help of a machine shop. Or, an Evo Harley.
 

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Call your attorney and/or be prepared to take the owner of the dealership to court (I imagine it is small claims- $5000 or less).



First thing, though, is to let the owner know you'd rather not call your attorney; you'd rather have them buy it from you at market value (they will offer you low blue book, if anything). If you're looking for a new bike, consider guilting them into a sweet deal on a trade-in for one of their new models. The new one is under warranty anyways, so if you have problems with it, you can enact the lemon law. I doubt you would have that luck though.



Good luck.
 

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The Toad
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I'll suspend judgement until I've checked out that new dealership (dealer.. get it?) in LA. You know, that new one... "Mscuddy's Motorcycle Repair and Head Shop".



 

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That's becoming more and more true. The only time my bike is in the shop is for valve adjustments because I don't have the patience or eyesight for it, and that's only while it's under warranty. I think in the future I'll stick to air cooled BMWs, Triumph twins or Harleys.



My Trophy satisfies my performance needs with 108hp, and is a keeper. The next bike or bikes will be simple and straightforward play bikes.



Ok, ok, maybe I'll get a Bandit....they're fun and simple.
 

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Since the bikes for sale anyway I'd say the shop just bought it off you, That or get a lawyer. In Washington State the Attorney Generals office has a motor vehicle dept. that'll really go to bat for you, if your state has a similar set-up I'd use them if I had to.



Your first step is a sit down with the Service Manager and shop owner, calmly explain what happened, and that you want them to buy the bike for fair market value and see what they have to say. If they try to punk you then start making calls and writing letters.......
 

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The Toad
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Only 108hp? Get with the program, man. You know you gotta have at least 150hp to have any fun at all!



Seriously, if you hang around motorcycle sites and read too many m/c magazines you may get "hp envy". The cure for "hp envy" is to actually go riding. Just a quick jaunt on my old "weakling" 100hp air/oil-cooled boat anchor and I'm cured of all "hp envy". Heck, a short buzz on the 70hp Magna cures it too.
 

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Stories like this are why I do all the regular maintenance on my bikes. It's possible that the guy at the dealership is a better mechanic than I am, no doubt he works faster... but I care more about the final result.



 

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I used to be an Assistant AG in the WA Attorney General's office for 25 years. This was not the sort of claim that the AGO would handle - the "lemon law" dealt with defects in new vehicles, not problems that arose because of flawed maintenance.



That said I agree that the best suggestion is to tell the dealer it just bought itself a bike at fair market price.
 

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Not to say the dealer isn't wrong, because they ARE at fault, no argument there. but...



doesn't anyone do a pre-ride check b4 they scoot off, especially if someone else has been messing with THEIR bike?



I dunno, maybe i'm the only one... ?

 

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A sight glass means never having to say you're sorry

Even great service shops make mistakes, but this one made a doozie. Unfortunately this happens more than we'd all like to think. I do all of my own bike maintenance just to avoid things like this but the exact same thing happened to my nearly new F-250 (at the dealer) and I requested and they agreed to rebuild the engine. Must have cost them a fortune, but they were pretty cool about the whole thing.

Best of Luck.

-sbp
 
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