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I'd generally suggest that you take a few easy trail rides to get your confidence back. But, even though you say that you are physically unscathed, a dislocated shoulder will rule that out. Get some good physical therapy, regain complete strength and try again in the spring. Start in the dirt with a light bike. An XR100 would be perfect. Slide it in turns, practice hard braking, get used to losing and regaining control. Then move on to a MSF course with a heavier bike. But move at your own pace. Tension will ruin your control and that is essential to safe street riding. Good luck.
 

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You're probably right! Ask those who will give you the answer you want, right? I've heard alot of people recommend a track day, maybe I should listen more! Can you still go to these type of things with a touring bike? How do they help? I'm curious.
 

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Re: change of pace

I wasn't expecting this many replies! I guess alot people crash, huh! Thanks again for replying, this is helpful.

I think you're right about the type of bike. I was thinking about a another sport touring bike, like a BMW RT or a Councours, but I wasn't ignoring cruisers or full touring bikes for just that reason. I used to drive a sporty car, pretty quick, stick shift, alot of fun, but I did notice I was driving quicker and more aggressively. My wife and I recently had out first child, so after a few months, I decided to sell the 2 door and buy a 4 door for practacality. I still had the bike for fun, right? I noticed a big change in driving habits, its a pretty slow car, pretty boring, doesn't exactly reward you with sharp handling and quick acceleration, so I tend to relax a bit and just chug around. So the thought of buying a big tourer or cruiser did occur to me, maybe it would have the same effect on my riding. I was always more careful on the bike anyway, but obvioulsy not careful enough. I'm just not sure I'm ready for an 7-800lb bike! Thanks though. I was always a Ultra Classic but until they're about $8000, I'll just have to admire them from a distance!
 

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The Toad
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I've dumped seriously a couple of times too. I still have a steel pin in my right ankle from one of them. Each time I said I was gonna quit riding, but the bug is too strong and I've decided that if I can't do the things I like to do then what's the point?

You could decide to take up boating instead of biking and then drown after getting hit by some pothead on a jetski. Or you could decide to take up knitting and some junkie could break in your house and shoot you. It is impossible to live without some risk. And if one tries to live without risk then one ends up just sitting at home worrying all the time and writing one's legislature frequently demanding that the govt "do something". That's no way to live. One could even *gasp* become a cager.

Take time to take a quiet walk every day and look at the environment around you. You'll come to see that the world is actually not that dangerous of a place. Avoid watching the news. It's mostly BS and it's main is effect to make you feel afraid and helpless. You'll feel much better pretty soon.

Try getting ABS on your next bike. Avoid idiots pulling trailers.

Live to ride. Ride to live.
 

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Boating and knitting? Nah. I don't think so! The thought of putzing around the same piece of lake everytime I go out would bore me to tears. And knitting, well, I'm not very creative, what can I say.



I've only been riding a couple of years and I thoroughly enjoy it, so in short, I'll probably get back on and buy another bike. Hopefully any panic and flashbacks will be minimal and after awhile I'll be able to enjoy as much as I used to. I'll take it easy and enjoy the view more instead. Its the best way to travel, definately the most fun, and obviously the most painful if you make a mistake! Still, I live in surburbia, work in a office, drive a 4 door sedan......I think I need a little something to stir things up. My wife has been very supportive as well, although I'm not sure she'll jumping on the back anytime soon.



Thanks for the advice. ABS, no idiots. Got it.
 

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I too have had a similar crash. Being a m/c officer I have had great training but stilled locked up the front brake when the big moment hit. I had on my helmet & jacket , both of which were damaged, but I also cracked a rib that continuously bothers me. I couldnt hide this from my wife and she was bothered by this incident. However, she knows what I like to do and I enjoy the heck out of being paid to ride a m/c all day. It is hard to change your personality and if you do, you might end up a bitter old man. That scene replaying in your mind and all the "what if's" are your subconscious saying your insecure (like a cop dreaming about his gun failing is a sign he is insecure). You fix that by telling yourself that you are safe, take a msf class to increase your confidence, and get a new m/c to ride like the wind.

Your wife will appreciate how much better you feel after a ride and can take the little one off her hands a while. You know you will feel better so get back on the pony & ride.

*Be careful of riding to easy though as some may suggest. You will never feel confident again and you'll end up caged. I've seen this happen several times, like a boxer acting timid after he gets clocked good the first time.

Good luck
 

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The best way to get over it, in my opinion, is getting back on a bike as soon as possible. When I got rear-ended and broke an arm and a couple of ribs I was back on a new bike one month after the crash, as soon as the insurance claim went thru and I got the money to replace the totaled, brand new Bmw R1150 GS. For the first couple of weeks I rode with the cast still on my left arm. the elastic wrap for the ribs came off much later. I wish you a speedy recovery, both physically and emotionally. riding is to much fun to give up on it. good luck
 

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Or a bitter little man, like erstwhile MO editor, JPB.
 

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And get a bike with ABS...

I've watched the BMW demo (a common feature on the demo rides), where on a country road with a fair bit of gravel on it, they take the K-LT up to >60 and then brake hard.

Chirp chirp chirp stop.

Locking the front is one of the spookiest things imaginable when you DON'T crash.
 

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SemiSportbikes with ABS...

There are two, "Semi" sportbikes (that is, ~10 years ago would have 100% ruled the street, but now are called comfy sport-tourers) which are available in the US with ABS.

The Ducati ST4 and the VFR. In both cases, its about a ~$1k option.

Also, the FJR1300, a bit heavy, a bit slower steering, but an engine that wouldn't be out of place on a steamship, and again, a $1k option.
 

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And if you see a Volvo pulling a trailer, get off the road completely, and come to a full stop.
 

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Yes, you can do a Track Day on just about any bike that isn't dropping fluids onto the track. (Please, no Harley cracks from the MOrons). Full Dress Tourers, Choppers and Boss Hoss' have been seen at track days, so a good ST will be no problem. During MO's 2003 Sport Tour, I took our Triumph Sprint ST to a trackday and had a blast.
 

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How about a Dual-Sport?

How about trying something that can take you to places w/o cars? Like the KTM 950 Adventure? It could give you all that our ST1100 had to offer plus the ablility to go off-road. Maybe you will be able to find "roads" that you don't have to share w/cars. Just a thought.

Singles and Twins Forever!!
 

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Re: How about a Dual-Sport?

Yeah, but unless he is an NBA player, he'll need a stepstool to get on and off the KTM. That seat is WAY up there!
 

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Works for me.



Certainly it's much better than seeking out the company of potheads and junkies.



Now if we could just eliminate cell phones and make-up on the road we'd be sailing free.
 

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Re: How about a Dual-Sport?

The 950 adventure is absoloutely awesome, but it won't offer everything the ST 1100 did. It is proportioned like a dirt-bike, this means that the seat is tall and narrow. The ergoes work well off-road and in canyons, but on a long-straight highway drone, the 950 seat will quickly have a touring rider wishing he was back on an ST 1100.
 

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LIMEDUST, you've sure got a lot of good ideas so far.

As a fellow ST11 rider I know the awful feeling of having the beaST break loose. Fortunately for me, my worst was on dirt so we low sided and bike and I just slid to a stop with only minor plastic breakage on the bike and a few scrapes on the helmet. We got back up and went on with a more respectful attitude of the bikes bulk and of my own limitations. If you were in OKC I'd let you take my '98 for a spin just to get you back in the saddle. That has always helped me put the nightmares away and better evaluate myself.

When my Wife had her hard (and expensive) low side after overcooking a decreasing radius right-hander on her V-Star 1100 she had to get back on the bike. We were on a curvy back road in the middle of podunk OK and we had to get both her and the bike home. After doctoring her scrapes (road rash, torn jeans and other minor injuries) we pulled the right crashbar (installed two weeks earlier) off because it was pushed up into the rear break peddle. Once the rear wheel could move again we pulled all the broken pieces off and put them in my side case, straightened out the front forks, cleared the loose asphalt off her full face Quantum’s chin bar and face shield and headed the 85 miles home.

She was shaken for sure. It took her almost two years to be comfortable going into turns again but she kept at it. Many might ask, why? Why would someone do something that caused such apprehension? The reason is in the answer from many who've already posted. She found she loved riding her own bike so much that any anxiety she felt was something she would have to overcome.

This happened to her early in her riding life and she has recognized what many had been telling her; riding is a constant learning activity that continues for as long as you ride.

Whatever you decide it sounds like you did everything right but there is always something to learn from a crash. The only way I know to learn it is to get back on the bike and find out what it is.
 
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