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used over here in most tyre changing places as standard....dont know the reason for it though..thought it was more to do with the tyre keeping an even pressure at all temperatures..could be wrong on that ...btw first
 

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The nitrogen claim of improved economy and the like is junk. Where nitrogen shows any advantage for a vehicle or motorcycle is the racetrack where it warms at a much more linear and predictable pace than regular compressed air. I'd say if you're going to be doing some track days then it's worthwhile, otherwise don't expect any other change in behavior.
 

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Waiter, there's water in my air

dry air is 78% nitrogen already - so the difference is not in the "air" part, it's in the "dry" part.

it's the water vapor in the air that makes the diff, kids.

- water vapor will happily condence and re-vaporize inside of your tire - and thus you'll get a range of tire pressures

- ever notice that if you blast a bit of air out of an air hose that it feels wet? well, when you expand a gas, it cools (that's pV=nRT), so you get extra liquid water in your tires each time tht you fill them from the hose. and then you go out and zoom around...and it vaporizes, or condences...

of course, the actual difference is pretty small, and maybe only valentino can really feel it.
 

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Especially when you sleep through statistics class.
 

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The important thing is to change the air in your tires every 5000 miles.



It's up to you whether to use regular or synthetic.



I use Helium in my tires, to compensate for my lardass.



 

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I've known people (racing types) who carry a relatively small cylinder of high pressure nitrogen to the track to pump up their suspension components. As long as they are taking it along, they put the nitrogen into the tires. Saves carrying along an air compressor, or borrowing a "psssstt" from the neighbor's compressor.



As someone already posted, it's the fact that it's dry, not that it's nitrogen, that makes the difference. An external resorvoir shock absorber much prefers dry fill gas, not some moisture to get in with the oil. There are lots of tires that certainly contain some moisture, and they seem to work OK, so I'd disbelieve any claims of enhanced performance.
 

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Besides the water vapor, there are other gases which may have small enough molecules to escape through your tire's compunds, hence the need to reinflate. Hence, if you have 100% nitrogen from the get-go, you may not need to inflate as often.



At least, that's what my pal the FAA-certified aviation mechanic said when I asked him about benefits in street tires. Apparently, aerospace tires are inflated with pure nitrogen for similar reasons.

 
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