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Seru's right about the gloves. And

SMhelmets work great too. They're a bit heavier but generally warmer and if equiped with double face-shields, fogging is kept to a minimum.
 

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I find cold weather gloves an annoyance (too bulky), but I used to use them. Since I now have a bike with heated grips, I no longer need my winter gloves since my hands stay warmer with the grips than they ever did in gloves. Any bike that I buy in the future will get the heaters installed. Check out the aerostitch catalog for some neat grip heaters.



Francis
 

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If you ride a lot in cold conditions, bite the bullet and go electric.



It may be one of the reasons your hands get so cold is because your core temp has dropped, and your body is shutting off the blood flow to your extremities.



Widder (for one) has a really nice vest with glove connections. I'm South of I-10, so the vest keeps me (and my hands) nice and toasty warm during the "cold" weather.



Although an option, I don't see the need for a thermostat. I'm usually not that busy when I'm riding.



HTH
 

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I own these gloves from Widder as well as a non-heated pair from Alpinestars that are now discontinued, but similar to the WR-1 gloves.

The heated gloves are for sub-freezing temperatures only. The bulk and hassle of plugging them in keep them in the bag more than on my hand. The Alpinestars with my heated grips turned up to "deep-fat-fry" are good from anywhere from 35F up to about 65F. Warmer than that and I switch to thin gloves which let me feel the heat more directly so I'm good from 50F on up.
 

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I second that

An electric vest (and gloves) is the best money you'll ever spend. Sometimes it gets in the 50s here and I really appreciate it.

Go ahead and spring for the thermostat too. It's not an on/off type but can be adjusted for a constant temperature.
 

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GO electric!

I agree. I commute home at 2am regularly in the low 30s in the winter. I have tried all sorts of things, but there is nothing like heated clothing. Once you try it you will wonder why you suffered all those years. I have found that with the Gerbing electric jacket liner and some polypropelyene thermals I can ride comfortably down to about 25 degrees with regular non perforated gloves. As someone mentioned above if the core body temp stays up, the hands will be warm because the body is not shunting warm blood away from the extremities to maintain core body temp. I tried the gerbing glove liners but didnt need them...maybe someone in MN or something might, but it never gets below 15-20 degrees where I live. Also you need to check the power output of the charging system on your bike. Gerbings was helpful...I just called and they told me what my bikes output was and recommended what to get based on how much power I had available. Very helpful and knowledgeable people. I had no problem returning the glove liners...they didnt even ask why. I never used widder, but Gerbings has excellent customer service.
 

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Re: I second that

"50 degrees and sometimes it rains" Sounds like July in Seattle. However, replace the "sometimes" with half of the time. The hard core riders here at work (BMW riders mostly with some Gold Wingers) agree with Buzz electric is the way to go.
 

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Lots of good suggestions above. Motorcycle gloves are designed to fit a hand that is gripping a handlebar, so it is curved to fit properly.



Here's a tip. Buy winter gloves one size larger than would normally fit you perfectly. You end up with more space inside the glove, which helps reduce heat transfer. This is done at the loss of some tactile feel, but winter gloves have this trade-off anyway.
 

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Aftermarket handle-grip heaters! I installed them on my SV1000S and I can now use my summer gloves all year round! Like many other people who have tried heated handle-grips, I can never own a bike without them anymore.
 

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Try a middleweight glove, then get some glove liners for colder weather. Layers = Flexibility



I've been pretty happy with a pair of Helimot Buffalo 365s with some thinsulate liners in the winter. The combo seems to work alright from about 20 to 90 degrees fahrenheit, with slight discomfort at either end of that, but I've yet to get frostbite. The gloves without the liners work well from about 55-90, plus they have a great feel to them (deerskin is nice).



If you ride in even colder weather, you really should go electric.

 
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