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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Excellent. There's one more overweight fiftysomething Harley poseur off the road. One down, a zillion to go.



Wonder why he kept the bike. Maybe he kept the riding costume as well (logo-festooned jacket, black tee-shirt, doo-rag, fringed chaps) so he can dress up as a "biker" at Halloween!



Anyway, other than the opening paragraphs, the article wasn't that bad. Wish we could see more of the same pointing out that the cagers are a big part of the problem.

 

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Don't worry, Harley rider still have it covered in the a**hole dept. I don't think they'll be overtaken anytime soon. I've even heard that's part of the agrement when you buy a Harley, you cannot wave and must be an ass to all that you meet.
 

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On a recent workday in Seattle, there was two fatal wreck involving motorcycles. Both involved 700 lb Harleys and 50+ riders. Since this summer has been dry the number of motorcycle riders commuting to work has increased dramatically. It seemed for awhile there was an motorcycle accident every day for awhile. I travel 62 miles a day on the two most congested freeways in Seattle, 5 days a week. Every motorcycle accident I have seen this summer has involved a cruiser and a 50+ year old rider. I have not seen one sportbike down. I have seen an increase of young sportbike riders. These kids ride fast and agressive but I haven't seen one of them down.. I think there is something to the superior reaction time theory of young riders and of course kpaul's own theory that says the safest bike is the modern sportbike.

kpaul's theory is that because cruisers are such dogs (heavy and non-agile), cruisers are sitting ducks for commuting.
 

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You just couldn't wait to post that could you? I got another scenario for you; how about we assume those driver that don't pay attention also buy motorcycles. While I do think riding a bike helps with driving skills, I refuse to believe many drivers/riders continue to practice basics or seek advanced instruction.
 

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I think a lot of the +50 cruiser types may be a lot less experienced than they think they are. And older guy can delude himself into thinking he's better than he is--it just takes him longer to talk himself into it. Reactions may be a bit slower, but the real killer on motorcycles is judgement. You have to realize that you have chosen a sport that is inherently dangerous. You cannot kid yourself about that. People don't see you. You can disappear into someone's "blind spot" and stay there a lot longer than a car, just because you're smaller. I ride, and I've lost track of motorcycles myself--it just goes with the territory. The prudent man considers himself invisible, and rides in the part of the lane where he can be seen the most. Most of us who have been riding a while know this, but to a lot of guys who rode a little when they were kids, then came back to the sport when the kids were out of the house and they had a few bucks to spare may not realize how many different ways there are to get yourself in trouble. By the way, Squid, on a trip to BC many years ago, all the people in Portland seemed to think we should be extra careful in Washington, because 'they all drive like idiots' When we were leaving Vancouver (BC) coming back to the states, they were all saying to watch out for those 'nuts in Washington' I think they were talking about the state. Is it still like that up there?
 

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Hmmm.. I actually think WA drivers are actually more polite than CA, CO, TX, and FL . i.e the other places I have lived... OR folks are probably overwelmed with Seattle traffic. Everytime I go to Portland I think wow nice little city... I think its a matter of scale. Compared to OR ...WA seems probably nutty.. But to me compared to CA ...WA is tame..Everytime I go down to SoCal and see the lanesplitters I think wow this is a different league..



I think you are spot on your analysis. I ride to a old drive in (has car shows ever weekend) ever other weekend to meet some friends to go riding. Each time we go there we see 50ish guys riding cruisers who have a hard time negotiating the parking lot.. Some of these guys are way overweight etc. Just think their bikes are at least 300 lbs heavier than mine..
 

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Seems as though someone else has struck a nerve with you electraglider. Are you fifty something and relatively inexperienced? I'm fifty something and have owned Harleys in the past, but I also shake my head in dismay at the amount of people my age to which a motorcycle is a newly acquired life-style affectation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It is, but.....

Surely you don’t think I talking about you, electraglider. Maybe I should have capitalized the word POSEUR in my post.

From what I’ve seen, everyone on this forum is passionate about motorcycles. Passionate about their Harleys, Ninjas, Airhead BMW’s, whatever. Many of us seem to have more than one brand of bike. Most of us seem to have a long-standing love affair with all things motorcycle. The pool of technical expertise among us is amazing. Can’t say that I’ve seen evidence of a POSEUR among us.

Now, compare your typical MO subscriber with Kubitz. He is a software company CEO that rode motorcycles "as a kid," but apparently took a 30-year break while he was making his fortune. In 2000, he plunks down $15,000+ for motorcycle that he rode 1918 miles over the next four years. I’m guessing he took exactly zero rider training, and probably never bothered to get the M/C endorsement on his license. One close call and he parks –but doesn’t sell - his motorcycle.

Does this sound like a guy that is passionate about motorcycling? Or does it sound like all those people we both know that finally get the kids off to college, cruise into the local Harley boutique, buy a bike and a costume to match, have the dealer install $5,000 worth of chrome and straight pipes, and then commence to tell everyone they know all abut the Harley "lifestyle."

I’m guessing these guys annoy you more than they do me!
 

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Casual Riders

Motorcycle ownership my be up in Arizona, but I ride everyday to work here and don't see many more riders out actually riding their bikes on a day to day basis.

What I see is a whole lot of weekend casual riders that ride once in a great while like once a month on weekends.

It's no wonder their accident avoidance skills are somewhat lacking.
 

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"Every motorcycle accident I have seen this summer has involved a cruiser and a 50+ year old rider. I have not seen one sportbike down. "



So I guess that means that only 50+ year old riders crash and nobody on a sportbike ever crashes. Would that be correct? Please spare us your bullshyt for about 5 minutes and get back to reality. Hell, you don't even ride a motorcycle anywhere, so your chances of crashing is zero. A good rider on one of those slow, heavy bad-handling cruisers would hand you your ass on any twisty road you could pick. I'd bet everything I have on it. I think we could prove it easily if you have the guts to show everyone what you got.
 

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Re: Casual Riders

Exactly! Motorcycle riding does require skills and habits that are lacking if you can only ride once a month or so. Can you handle a panic stop if you ride about 2000 miles a year? Maybe, but I ride ca. 1000+ a month both in traffic and up the canyons, and I know I have a feel for the way my bike handles and reacts. I also know how to scan traffic, react to small cues from motorists, etc.

BTW, the British actor who plays House on TV (it's a medical type show) says that since he moved to SoCal he rides his Triumph everywhere and he cannot believe that everyone isn't riding to work with the weather we have. It points out one difference with Europe, where a bike IS basic transportation, not just something you ride once a month.
 

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I have a friend who had a close call on a 999 Duc and sold it, afterward. He had a Ninja 9 and many years on & off the track. If you aren't comfortable riding then logic dictates you shouldn't ride, whether you have loads of riding experience or very little. Deaths will rise with the increase in number of riders, it's a simple equation. You can however reduce your chances of an accident and your survival probabiltiy. It's a question of what are you willing to do to increase the good and reduce the bad. It'a all up to you.
 

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Re: Casual Riders

I grew up in SoCal riding full time for 6+ yrs, 150k+ miles. I recently returned and bought a cycle-tool appropriate to the task. Given the fact that the freeways here seriously resemble video games, the old guy / cruiser combo is a recipe for disaster.

I bought a KTM Duke; 300 lbs and 60+ horsepower, able to leap curbs and speedbumps with a single bound.

A scapel, not a butter knife, is what's needed to give one a fighting chance.
 

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I love to get you guys pumped up. As W would say "Mission Accomplished!". As you know, longride we have had this discussion before. This summer I have been riding 100 miles a weekend. Remember I have beautiful twisty, hilly, evergreen lined roads just a few miles from my house. Ever kpaul beautful WA state mile = 100 longride flat, straight Chicago miles.. So yes I'll take that challenge. Next summer I'll make the trip to MO World HQ and we can settle this. I would gladly do it now but I am in a new job, managing a new group, etc. So as FoxNews Bill O'Really would say "What say you?"
 

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Re: Casual Riders

Excellent Post.. Well Said
 

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Re: Casual Riders

"Can you handle a panic stop if you ride about 2000 miles a year? Maybe, but I ride ca. 1000+ a month both in traffic and up the canyons, and I know I have a feel for the way my bike handles and reacts. "

Excellent point. I ride 100 miles a week on the weekend..I know I am rusty in panic stops compared from when I used to commute to work everyday.. To me if anyone on MO is expert in commuting you have the numbers to be that person..
 

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Re: It is, but.....

Nicely done. I agree the typical MO subscriber is not what you are talking about. Every weekend you can go to nay HD dealer and see the folks you are talking about. Well said.
 

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Excellent Points. I was going to paint my bike black from yellow. My buddy who has a black big Triumph Daytona said since he bought his bright hi-vis yellow vest he has reduced his close calls. He showed me some pictures of him riding in shady areas with the vest vs without. It was pretty telling. Excellent Post.
 
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