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Admittedly, I had to laugh a little reading about the bike droppings and especially the Ford Ranger vs. Bike mishap. I laughed because it reminded me of some of the "rookie" mistakes that I have seen/heard about/done. Dropped bikes? You bet. I have dropped two of them all by myself. One was at a stop sign trying to get a better look at a leak in a carb (which I did get once the bike was laying on its side.) The other was in my garage because my foot landed in an oil puddle from my car—ever see a guy do the splits over the top of a CB650? I bet you think that probably hurt?.…Uhhhhhh, yeah. (TIP: Remember kids, cowboy boots, oil on the floor, heavy bikes, and skinny punks don’t mix well; so use caution!) Moral to the story: mistakes are all part of learning and everybody has made them. Don’t be afraid to review your mistakes and discuss them with an experienced rider/instructor. Once you understand why your mistake happened, you will not do it again. It is truly amazing how much you can learn from another rider. As far as women riding bikes, I’m all for it. The more people that are welcomed into a sport, the further it will advance—yes, guys, that means it’s a good thing for you too. I want to praise you women who break the stereotypical bull S*** that women should cook, clean and play with little lacey dolls. That is total crap. You should do what makes YOU happy. If lacey dolls make you happy, fine, if riding motorcycles makes you happy, that is fine too. Don’t be intimidated by men, or other women into not trying something as fun as motorcycling. Remember, jerk’s (both men and women) are everywhere, bike shops (the very people who should want to expand their market by selling you a bike!), service departments, fellow riders, people on the road, and so on and so forth, you get the idea. Don’t let an idiot, or two, stand in your way. Do, however, take a safety training course, ask for help, talk to other riders, learn about the functional aspects of your machine, and wear a helmet at all times! Good luck to all, and wishes of many safe and rewarding miles.
 

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Try something heaver and taller like...how about an old air cooled 1100? Put it on a little angle and watch it high side you like a spatula under a flapjack. -- then have one of your friends help you lift it back up! Lighter, shorter bikes are easier to handle, that is a fact. Old and heavy bikes (like a lot of people try to begin on) are easy to drop -- trust me.
 

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I helped a friend cart home a very nice used CB750. I recomended that he should start out on my old CM200T and learn to ride before he jumped on a powerful, heavy bike. He didn't...My friend crashed the bike in the barnyard the first night he owned it! Good lesson learned. Too big of a bike for a beginning rider = trouble. The beginning guys and girls on 250's and 500's are the ones with a good mellon on their shoulders. Drivers ED cars aren't Porsche's for a reason.
 
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