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Oh my God!

OMG, they liked it. Despite being a Triumph and having an underpowered motor... they actually liked it!

Smart-a$$ comments aside, I did like it too when I test rode it, but it needs torque (a lot of torque) for me to really enjoy it. It runs smooth and the handling was (IMO) at least as good as that of the Mean Streak (only lighter!) but it desperately needs more torque. It's not cheap either.
 

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I commend Mr. Burns and Minime on their objectivity. The review covered this bike *as a cruiser*, rather than trying to measure it against sport bike standards. That's certainly good enough for me.
 

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Hats off to triumph for trying, but they have such a rich heritige of beautiful designs of they're own it's a shame they have to go a sticking fat rear fender and struts on this one, the front fork is a little wide looking too, While it's not a harley clone, it's definately got the cruiser pork, they should expand on the new Bonnie style or something like a Norton Commando style, Brit bikes got popular because they were'nt big fat Harley's or *****'s. and they ran and handled better, Maybe they could build a retro Vincent or something, I guess I just don't get the cruiser trip or somthing, except the yamaha warrior, thats passable...My own opinion, [and we know what they're like ]
 

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Super Duper Mod Man
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The very first street bike I ever owned after many years in the dirt was a 72 Bonnie. I followed that up with a 76 many years later. I don't remember Triumph Bonneville heritage EVER being a "cruiser". They were sporting bikes that were lean and fast. Could be made leaner and faster very easily too. This is a response to the "cruisers sell" idea of production, and this one is about as real as Triumph's 100th anniversary. First, they forgot they went out of business, next, they forgot their heritage. Harley was always about cruisers and that success brings us the Triumph America. Bring on a lean, mean streetfightin' Bonnie and I will have a good look at that one.
 

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An open apology to Cruiser types.

After reading about Lord Burn's own bias against cruisers, I reflected on the source of my bias. Maybe there is hope for me and my bias is a function of age and experience. I apology for using the word Chumps to describe Cruiser owners. It was definitely immature to suggest that someone who purchased a bike without the latest components and technology (i.e. the motorcycle equivalent of 68 Impala or as Burns says a 70s land yaht )was geting taken. This Truimph Cruiser appeals to me because it is different than Harley but has certain timeless/classic look about it. i.e it grows on me. The BMW cruiser has a similar effect on me. Sorry Cruiser guys, this punk squid has a lot to learn. Funny it took a Bitter Little Man to open my eyes :)
 

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I am not a 'cruiser' fan. BUT, I love the America styling. The vertical twin is meshed in with a today's market styling that actually has me thinking I might own a cruiser. Hey, it's not perfect. NO motorcycle reviewed has ever been perfect for every person. In the world of compromise to make a motorcycle sell (and make a company profitable) this one I think is a big thumbs up. If my local dealer is any indication (all sold out) then a few folks out there must be hip on this bike too! Guess I'll wait until next year and maybe a few of the bugs might be worked out.
 

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Re: Bonnie America Experience

I had a chance to ride the Bonnie America during the Triumph demo rides at Sears Point earlier this year (at the Historic Motorcycle Races). Frankly, I rode this bike because all of the other Triumphs were already signed out for the day and, heck, I'd rather ride the cruiser than nothing at all.

Anyway, the bike I rode had the factory "off road" pipes and jet kit. These seemed to give it a lot more power than the stock model you rode in this test... but they were REALLY loud.

The amazing thing to me was that I also had a chance to ride the BMW R1200C at BMW's demo tent a few minutes later over the same 20 mile route. Again, the cruiser was the only bike not already signed out from the test fleet.

The BMW cost nearly twice as much as the Triumph, vibrated more, felt slower and heavier and had a much worse ride... especially from the harsh rear suspension.

This comparision made me appreciate the Triumph more except for the horrible riding position. At 5'6" I should be a perfect target audience member for a low-slung cruiser like this. However, most of these bikes insist on sticking the foot pegs way out in front. Inseam-challenged riders like me are especially uncomfortable with this, as I actually found that I needed to pick myself off of the seat to reach the brake pedal! And 5'6" isn't THAT short.

I'm not a fan of the styling of the Bonneville America, especially those heavy-looking rear foot-peg brackets, either. For my money, the regular Bonneville looks much better and is much more comfortable.
 

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Re: An open apology to Cruiser types.

If you care to expand your knowledge a little further, you'll find that the classic timeless triumph look is most deffinatly not a cruiser, though they did make a faired in cop bike way back when, your sport bike is the desendent of the cafe style that copied race bikes of the time when triumph, BSA, and Enfield were the hot bikes to have, Check out Caferacer.com for some cool old photos and background on the whole scene, or else go to Teddy's on Roosevelt Ave. and check out some cool Brit bikes from the V.M.E. I think it's the 3 rd thursday or something, sit back, sip a beer [or pop] and get educated young man.
 

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Re: Bonnie America Experience

i'm with you on the rear footpeg bracket thing...it looks like the pegs are growing out of the cover of a toolbox or something. definately doesn't look like something i'd want to trust my girlfriend's gorgeous legs to. after the off road pipes and a jet kit, that's the next thing that'd have to be changed.
 

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Maybe you were not around in the '60s to see all the chopped and bobbed Triumphs and BSA's that were on the road at that time and still could be seen on the road in the '70s.



Triumph does have a history with what is now termed as a cruiser.
 

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Triumph heritage?

I originally wanted to post this HERE, not in the TT600 section...

What's wrong with the Triumph heritage? Why not a scrambler style standard with high pipes? Or go back to the drawing board on the Bonneville and make it more like the W650? The Japanese Big 4 would give their left nut to have a nostagic and heritage invoking brand name like Triumph to slap on their retros. Triumph has it (A classic name that will make boomers empty their wallets), but they are wasting it by trying to out-tech the Japanese or build cruisers.
 

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Super Duper Mod Man
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Well, bobbers aren't cruisers. They were more like stripped street/dirt machines. People made choppers out of Honda 750 fours too. Does that make Honda have a "history" of choppers too? Not sure what kind of "history" you mean. The old Meridan Triumph factory didn't, and never would have made this. Harley invented the cruiser with the Superglide back in 72. Sportster came out n the 50s. Why no copies from Truimph? Because inline fours were on the way and Triumph was busy developing a triple. Cruisers were never in the plans for anyone but Harley. Then Harley hits it big with cruisers and the copies come out of the woodwork. Sorry to disagree, but Triumph heritage was built on nimble sporting machines. Their answer to a Sportster was a Bonnie, and to the Superglide a Trident. Their answer to Harley sales success is the Bonneville America.
 
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