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Agreed. Put them back as they were. if you can't remember then perhaps you shouldn't have worked on your own bike. Given the bike has floating calipers that will handle a degree of lateral movement, if they are now jamming it must be obvious which way the spacers should have gone in.



Cheers

Merv.
 

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p.s. I should have added, if they are jamming then the wheel has been moved out of line and you'll now have a 929 with dud wheel alignment. So you gotta put the wheel back where it oughta be by changing the spacers - don't do something silly like trying to move the calipers to fit the new wheel position. Otherwise if you can't figure it out, MO's advice stands - get your dealer to fix it.



Cheers

Merv.
 

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Hey, let's lay off the guy. It's easy to make a simple mistake. I applaud him for at least making the attempt and then looking for help rather than just saying,"Screw it, I give up, I'll let the dealer do it.". He's got some follow through/



There are a lot of us out there just learning to work on our stuff.



--The Fox
 

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Time for a show of hands: how many people trust their dealer to work on their bike properly? And not to rush it, or assign it to a junior mechanic making $10/hour?



I remember when one dealer overfilled the oil majorly after a service... it was fun syringing the excess out the filler hole.



I wonder if they did the valve adjust properly, eh?



-- Michael







 

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I agree 100% It's a simple mistake and easy to make. I'm new to this myself, but also try to do all my own work. I've done engine+tranny rebuilds on cars and never had one in for service, so why start with my bike if I can help it. Besides, most dealers/shops rush (read 'suck') and all charge WAY to much.



He's smart to ask for help. There are some extremely knowledgeable folks on the boards here who might be able to help. Either way, he'll have learned from his mistake. Good luck!
 

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If you stick with a factory certified mechanic at a real dealership, you should be OK. If the factory guy screws up your bike, at least you have a chance to hold the dealership or manufacturer accountable to make it right.



I remember a friend of mine who tried to save a few bucks by getting his Harley serviced at a mom & pop bike shop instead of the dealership. They dropped his new Softtail off a lift and then refused to repair the damage they caused using genuine Harley parts because the "factory parts were too expensive"!

 

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give the guy a chance. i am 51 years old and do all my bike repairs. i have made a few mistakes over the years, but i just can"t drop my bike off at a dealer and later pick it up and ride away full of confidence. my advice, get a repair manual, and double check your work.
 

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Your wheel will always have some drag once you've pumped the brake back up. The hydraulic force that closes the calipers around the disk does not force them back open. As a result they will lightly drag the rotor. When you spin it without the calipers on it it will spin much more freely than with them on. This is very little drag compared to the power of the motor however. If by "stick" you mean the wheel won't spin at all, then that is a different matter entirely.
 

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Super Duper Mod Man
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This is exactly how you learn. I've made plenty of mistakes along the mechanical path, but learned to be more careful and organized as I went. As I have stated before, I wouldn't let 95% of the dealers put air in my tires, much less work on the bike. The first thing I do when buying a new bike, is going over all the things the dealer should have, such as axle bolts, brake bolts, chain tension, tire pressure, etc. You would be shocked at how many bikes come out with things wrong. My guess is, your next tire change will go much smoother. Stick with it.
 

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The Toad
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I couldn't possibly recall all the horror stories I've heard from people who relied on a dealer. You may have a good reliable dealer nearby or maybe not. However the only way to ensure a job is done properly is to do it yourself. If you are going to use a dealer, check out the back of his shop during luch hour to see if the mechanics are toking dope. (I have seen this). Obviously you don't want such people working on your bike.



The first thing you need is a good manual for the bike. I usually buy pick up a Clymer manual (these have handy parts blow-ups to aid proper reassembly) and any other manual I can find. Most manuals leave holes and having two or three will usually fill in any gaps.



Then simply acquire the proper tools and follow the instructions. VERY IMPORTANT before you actually start work is to look up all the words you don't understand while reading the manual. Don't try to guess what a word means, look it up. This will ensure you understand fully what you are trying to do.



If you have little or no mechanical experience start out with the easier regular maintenance tasks. These will be in the front part of the manual. As you gain familiarity with your bike you will find it easier to take on more and more difficult jobs until you are capable of taking as bike down completely to nuts and bolts and putting it back together again.



A really handy aid is a digital camera. Taking pictures of your work as you disassemble things can be invaluable when reassembling because almost no one remembers everything. Keeping parts together in plastic bags helps a lot too.



One can get one heck of a lot of satisfaction from doing one's own work, far above the $ you save by not paying the dealer $70/hour.



If you learn to do you own maintenance you will never again be at the mercy of some mechanic and it will be much harder for some unscrupulous dealer to sell you repairs you don't need.



And, though you may find it hard to believe, learning to do you own work will put you more in control of your bike(s) in general and will help you be a better rider than you otherwise would be.
 

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It's normal for the front calipers to drag a little after you take off the front wheel, at least all of my bikes have, once you get the spacers on the right way, bleed off a little brake fluid out of each side and try too push the pads back in a little, next time go to a home improvement store and get some small tapered wooden dowls and use them to hold the pads back in the calipers while the wheel is off, Also take notes, the spacers would appear to be differnt sizes so something like long=right or short=left will keep you from making that mistake again, unless you warped a disc or otherwise caused some damage, everything should work out fine, You might also try bleeding the front brakes to exercise the caliper pistons, if your going to work on your own bike, you really need to PAY ATTENTION to what your doing. and buy some good tools, I wouldn't bother with the pot-metal junk in the tool kit unless your on a BMW, their stock tools are first rate.
 

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Not much help this time...

but next time you take something apart, keep meticulous track of how it came apart. A lot of times I'll make a sketch and/or label the parts. I also try and lay the parts, screws, etc out on the floor like the came off. Yes, it is a pain. But it's pure gold when you don't remember how it came apart. Or, if you get interupted and can't get back to it for a week and your memory has faded.

I agree with the comments about dealers. You might be lucky enogh to live somewhere with a good independent shop or dealer, but I know a lot of people don't.
 

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Well, this set of posts shows who the enthusiasts are, and who just rides motorcycles! Shows who has had their bike screwed up at the shop, and who would prefer to screw it up themselves! Somethings I do (like oil changes, simple service and brake pad replacement), somethings I know better than to attempt!



After one instance of brake pads falling out (that were installed improperly by a dealer's now former mechanic) and putting my ass on the ground (yeppers, could have killed me) that is one operation that I do on ALL of my bikes (except the antique). Fortunatly for me, the pads somehow managed to stay in and work for 100 miles (distance from dealer to home, the retaining cotter key was missing on both both calipers) before falling out, while backing out of the garage (driveway is about a 6% grade). Cost the dealer an ass reaming, a saddle bag, running lights for the minivan we hit and some other sundry replacement parts.



Matter of fact, doing a 'brake job' on my Beemer this weekend and on whichever Harley I decide to ride (yes, ride, some of us still get to Daytona that way) to Daytona by way of Mouton Cove, La. for Mardi Gras (if freaking grand jury duty doesn't screw it up) right before Daytona!



You folks who just ride your bikes cannot possibly know them as well as the guy who at least tries to work on it himself. Man, never working on it yourself is like letting someone else do your SO, so you don't have to be bothered.....



One more thing, who was the gutless worm who wouldn't even sign his nasty ass comment? What a wuss....Staff my arse.....



James Allmond

Macon, Ga

03 HD FLHTCI

00 BMW K1200LT

88 HD FLHS/Watsonian Sodecar Rig

51 HD ServiCar (has antique (Studebaker) drum brakes, I don't touch those damn things)
 

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I agree. I am sure that most of us who work on our own bikes have made plenty of dumb mistakes (we won't talk about how many times I have accidently flipped the kill switch while working on it, only to tear everything apart trying to figure why it wouldn't start when I was done). However, it sounds like he has already identified the most likely cause -- has spacers reversed -- so I might have thought that having determined that, even an inexperienced wrench might have tried fixing that first?
 

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I think just because a rider chooses not to do his own work or has the means to have others do it does not mean he is not an enthusiast. I would think someone such as Jay Leno would be considered an enthusiast but I don't think he does much of his own work.
 

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I think just because a rider chooses not to do his own work or has the means to have others do it does not mean he is not an enthusiast. I would think someone such as Jay Leno would be considered an enthusiast but I don't think he does much of his own work.
 
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