Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As long as the bike is up to operating temp when this happens and your not lingering I would not worry about it in the least. What is the Red Line? In addition to this I very seriously doubt the dealer has any way to tell that this has happened and even if they did I would think it would be very very hard to deny you warranty claims 10k miles down the road. Just my 2 cents enjoy the new bike and keep the shiny side up.



Tom Wolfgang

1974 R90/6

2005 R1200 GS
 

·
Super Duper Mod Man
Joined
·
10,479 Posts
Running it up a bit won't do any harm. Everyone has their own method of break-in, but riding it too easy is worse than revving it up once in a while during those early miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I'm no mechanic or Ducati pro (not even close actually) but it's my understanding that as part of the quality control process before a motorcycle leaves the factory, all their engines are redlined. Therefore to me it seems that an occaisional, exhuberant twist of the throttle above the recommended rev range during the break-in period will not hurt the bike a bit. I agree with the previous poster that babying the bike too much during break-in can possibly be bad for the bike's cylinder walls. At least that's what I've read. Just my 0.02 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
Yeah, I'd havta agree with the rest of the comments here... you havn't done anything wrong.



The only comment I'd make is that you really do want to let the bike warm up properly before beating it. I have a Buell which has an often deserved rep for being an oil burner but mine doesn't cuz I broke it in properly and never thrash a cold engine.



P.S. So how do you like the power band on that Duc? I'm leaning towards getting a Multistrada 620 this spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Like others said, warm it up, ride it home from the dealer, but avoid highways or heavy traffic, try and get it through the rev range. After about 20-40 miles change the oil and filter to get out all the metal guck. Then go out and ride it like you stole it. ***** footing it isn't going to seal those rings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
There will be no problems with occassional red-lining whatsoever.



The only thing - I really recommend to change an oil by yourself. It's very easy, but you will avoid all the problems caused by dealer saving a few bucks and putting in some cheapo oil instead of something at least appropriate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
As a multi-Ducati owner I was apart of Ducati's customer satisfaction/quality survey that was later published and can be found on the web somewhere... But the most interesting ratio they did was comparing self-reported break-in habits and future complications with Ducati's by model. Those that followed Ducati's recommended break-in to the "T" actually reported the most engine/transmission problems later on when compared to those that self-reported ignoring the break-in guidelines. It's not necessarily break-in miles as it is heat cycles anyway... Some also claim the rings won't seat properly without goosing it... Whatever you decide to go with, seating the rings to the wall happens on the first ride or two, not 1500 miles as Ducati states. Like many others have stated, your bike will be fine...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Interesting piece. While it's true you can't hurt your engine by changing your oil too often, this guy jumps to 100% synthetic way too early, in our humble opinions. Some of those synths are so "good" they'll pretty much stop break-in right then and there, and 50 miles really isn't enough time. We'd say at least 1000 miles before using 100% synth, but if you want to change oil and filter every 20 feet go ahead.



He doesn't distinguish between water-cooled vs. air-cooled engines. A/C will have more noticeable changes during break in, due to their greater tolerances (i.e. bigger gaps in ring spacing, piston to bore etc.) and we'd be a little more conservative before pounding them. Especially with an older design like Ducati's 620, essentially an early-80's Pantah variant. After break-in, though, that motor seems to run a lot better if you beat the tar out of it instead of babying it.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,415 Posts
I follow the break it in fast it'll run fast school of thought myself. Most break in recomendations state you should vary the rpm, so I run my new bikes up and down the gears as much as possible. You want some RPM to set the rings while the cylinders still have the factory cross-hatching in them. Once that's worn smooth they'll never seat.



In fact the only thing I go easy on with new bikes is the brakes and tires till they're scuffed in good. I figure if there's a weak spot in the engine or drive train I want to find it as soon as possible, not when it's out of warranty and I have to eat it.
 

·
MODERATOR X
Joined
·
5,449 Posts
Just hold that sucker wide open, 'till she loosens up some.



No, seriously, here's how I break in stuff:



1: No "same" rpm cruising for extended periods (lugging verboten!).



2: Frequent stops for the first 500 miles to let the engine cool off.



3: A "full throttle" run through the gears every now and then.



4: An oil change and philter after the first 500 miles. Canister for you. And get the stanless filter (if the 620 has one).



You didn't hurt anything. In fact, you probably helped it.



And if you're breaking in an air-cooled 4 stroke I'd advise using a non-detergent single-grade oil for the first 200 miles (Valvolene 40). Helps hone in them thar parts real guud. Scuffs up the bore for an excellent ring seat.

 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top