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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi guys my first post and a question.

I have not riden in about 18 years............at 45 I am considering a street bike. I grew up riding dirt MX Enduro etc. for many years.From Yamaha yz's to Bultaco's to Hodockas

I know what I think I want, but am not sure I will be in over my head. I am looking at the Victory cruiser pkgs or the Yam. V-stars.

I also considered an Enduro type bike seeing that would be old hat for me. But I don't want to turn around in 3 months and try to sell it.

A little help would be greatly appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
How long have you been riding street?

Also thats exactly what I do not want to happen. I think I would just take it extra slow on a bigger bike than to have to and try and sell something I don't want or is not working for me.

I just have second thoughts on jumping on a big[cc] bike for the first street bike.
 

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How long have you been riding street?

Also thats exactly what I do not want to happen. I think I would just take it extra slow on a bigger bike than to have to and try and sell something I don't want or is not working for me.

I just have second thoughts on jumping on a big[cc] bike for the first street bike.
I've been riding less than a year. It didn't take me long to wish for a bigger bike. Don't get me wrong, the 650 is an excellent street bike to learn on though. However, I think that you could learn just as easily on a bigger bike if you use common sense and are careful.
 

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Guys, there is an alternative that is often discussed on this type of thread. That is: buy a bike that's such a commodity that it is super cheap and super easy to re-sell. Or trade. Or even keep as a beater bike or to let your S.O. or kid try out. The problems with making your decision a choice between a lower-powered, big, expensive bike and a higher-powered, big, expensive bike include: dropping said bike and spending a fortune to fix it; finding out you really don't like the actual riding part of the equation that much after all, being stuck with the bike's depreciation, or learning that the bike that you thought you'd like so much really sucks for you, but your pal's exact opposite bike is just what you really wanted.

9 out of 10 Doctors surveyed reported that 84% of new riders who used a samll, lightweight, under $2K motorcycle were happier than only 12% who were given a placebo in a blind study. Take a minute to read the sticky thread on New Bikers. The wisdom of the ages are transcribed for your edification.
 

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So, Gary, what's the reason you are interested in those bikes?

Looks?

Influence from your friends?

"Comfort"?

Have you ever ridden a heavy cruiser? Or are you just imagining what it would be like to ride one? They can be nice bikes and can be a comfortable fit for some people, but they don't fit everyone. Because you're a new rider (yes, you are) you don't have the experience necessary to tell whether a bike that seems comfortable on a showroom floor will feel comfortable on the road. Motorcycles move! You have to deal with the wind and with working the controls. Cruisers tend to feel good in a showroom, but they aren't necessarily so hot when they are moving.

So -- that's another reason to find something smaller and cheaper for your first road bike. Get a used Yam 650 if you want to try a cruiser - they are decent bikes, and you can decide if you like that style of motorcycle. If you find out cruisers make your back hurt (or whatever), you can find something better.
 

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Oft I get the impression by non-riders, or the "thousand-mile-a-year" riders that they want/ride a Cruiser because they take a look at the ads, and think to themselves "Hell! It's just like a friggin' Barcalounger with a V-Twin and handlebars! It absolutely MUST be the most-comfortable style of bike on the Planet, right?"

Right.

Same goes with the repli-racer Squids that are all hunched-over, layin' on the tank. So Comfy, must be able to nap there, huh?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, Gary, what's the reason you are interested in those bikes?

Looks?

Influence from your friends?

"Comfort"?

Have you ever ridden a heavy cruiser? Or are you just imagining what it would be like to ride one? They can be nice bikes and can be a comfortable fit for some people, but they don't fit everyone. Because you're a new rider (yes, you are) you don't have the experience necessary to tell whether a bike that seems comfortable on a showroom floor will feel comfortable on the road. Motorcycles move! You have to deal with the wind and with working the controls. Cruisers tend to feel good in a showroom, but they aren't necessarily so hot when they are moving.

So -- that's another reason to find something smaller and cheaper for your first road bike. Get a used Yam 650 if you want to try a cruiser - they are decent bikes, and you can decide if you like that style of motorcycle. If you find out cruisers make your back hurt (or whatever), you can find something better.
Thanks for the reply. Yes I am new to street bikes.

The interest grows from wanting something for the street [now that I have the $$ means] to saving a little at the pump, to wanting to get away for a while myself and or the misses.

Like I said I did grow up literally on a bike from around 5-6 years old.so approx 20+ years but NOT STREET. I know there is a difference!
No i have no friends that have bikes so the "one up ya" is not there.

Am I nervous that I would not like it YEP I also thought about getting my license and renting one for the weekend.

Thanks for all the replys that what I need is something to think on before I go drop 16000 on a bike.
 

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"The interest grows from wanting something for the street [now that I have the $$ means] to saving a little at the pump, to wanting to get away for a while myself and or the misses."

I think Sachi was actually asking what attracts you to Cruisers as apposed to sportsbikes, standards, maxi scooters or supermotos?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"The interest grows from wanting something for the street [now that I have the $$ means] to saving a little at the pump, to wanting to get away for a while myself and or the misses."

I think Sachi was actually asking what attracts you to Cruisers as apposed to sportsbikes, standards, maxi scooters or supermotos?
Gotcha!!
I think the thought of comfort as apposed to laying over I want to sit upright more. LOL My need for speed has greatly diminished as I get a little older;-) ;-)

I actually have thought about the supermoto as that would be right up my alley and be old hat!

But the cruiser has the take me for a long ride appeal :)

I think the other guy has it right the lazy boy on wheels thing.
i know its not that but..............
 

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Victory? Well made, but (as far as I've seen) usually not suited to comfortable cruising.

Gary, I repeat, that a cruiser will not necessarily be a comfortable ride. A big fat seat is not the only thing that helps comfort. On a cruiser, the problem is that ALL your weight is on your butt, so if the seat isn't perfect, you're not going to enjoy it. (A standard bike -- see my avatar -- allows the rider to support her weight with her legs and arms too.) Also, the seating position on a cruiser often curves the rider's back out, which is extremely tiring. Think of the Iron Butt Rally riders -- you don't see many (any) of them on cruisers, because that sort of fit is just not conducive to doing miles.

Like I say, a cruiser can be comfortable, but don't make the mistake of thinking it will be the most comfortable bike out there for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Awesome info Sachi thats why I asked the question! Thank you!

What kinda ride ya got there?

Yea I have a few back issues already so I don't want to add to that!
What would you suggest? i know its a huge theirs an [email protected]# for every seat kinda thing just get my licence and get testing???????????
 

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An analogy can be drawn by seeing how people have worked out the proper method of riding a horse. As JB once said they didn't put 2x4s on the stirrups so they could put their feet out straight. They also didn't invent saddles that made you crouch over the horse's neck constantly. The motorcycle that best approximates the horseman's riding position is, of course, the naked standard, the DP bike or the Adventure Tourer. They give the best combination of comfort, visibility and control. These bikes happen to be the epitome of motorcycle development and are owned by superior, discerning motorcyclists who recognize this trait.
 

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Gary, I have a Honda 599 (in the pic) and a 1989 CB-1. They are both small naked standards; the CB-1 has a bit more lean in the riding position.

There are quite a few standards out there to look into. Check out a 599 (if you can find one) or 919, a Yamaha FZ-6, Kawasaki KZ 750 (I think it is), or the various Triumph models. Just check out the seating position, and notice how much weight is on your feet and arms. (Keep in mind that in the wind, the wind will push you up off your arms.) Notice the curvature of your back on all of these. Imagine how it will feel when the wind is pushing against your chest. Will it bend your back out?

FWIW, I hold myself in place on the bike with my stomach and thigh muscles. That's comfortable enough for me to have earned Iron Butt certs three times over, and to do plenty of other long distance rides. If the bike fits you, you should not have to use your back muscles at all.
 

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Victory's build quality, fit, and finish are excellent. However, given their cost and your current riding skills, they may not be the best bike to get back into riding. What is your goal regarding motorcycling? Commuting? Boulevard cruising? Bar hopping?

I agree with Sachi. Hone your street skills on a standard, then when you are ready and feel confident, upgrade to the bike that speaks to you the most. (Disclosure: I prefer standards to cruisers any way.) One bike Sachi did not mention is the Honda Nighthawk 750.
 

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Buy a Used KLR 650, ride it for a year then decide what your second bike will be. You'll feel right at home on the KLR while getting your street skills up to par. You wont be out much green and will probably never sell it, or like me wish you hadn't.
That leaned back barcalounger feeling of a cruiser in the showroom is far from the feeling at speed. Always remember a major headwind is just a twist of the throttle away. So freeway speed you may be holding on for dear life and every bump on a cruiser shoots right up your spine as with the forward controls you have no feet to support your weight, just spine and backside. A bike that puts you in a slight forward lean is about optimal as you can lay into the wind instead of fighting it.
I rode dirt bikes from 5 to 18 then was bikeless till 29. I bought a 00 KLR and put 12k miles on it before I upgraded to my BMW. Check one out and see what you think.
 
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