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Can't hurt. Bike size and education.

You have to ride a lot of bikes over a number of years to realize they go as fast as you can ride them. And even when you reach that point you still wonder how nice it would be to have the latest 1000cc replica bike. I would hate to be 22 with a job that could get me on a CBR1000 for $0 down.
 

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Sounds like a Furfee to me, who heard of a motorcycle being rated in millilitres? Unless the Crow eaters (South Australians) have a different measuring system, it should read 250 cc, cubic centimetres.But there again,who else could think up a name like Myponga beach.The whole article sounds a bit on the nose.
 

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This system is, or used to be used in England and perhaps some other countries, including Japan I think. For me, the real issue is: Does it work, i.e. help, in terms of reducing deaths and severe injuries in novice riders? Are there any stats available? Many years ago I worked in a bike shop and when a novice bought a new large displacement, fast bike, there was a high probability that the bike would be brought back totaled and the rider would be dead. Looking at a table of the rate of fatalities vs. length of riding experience, one can see that the first two years have the highest probability of a fatal accident and that by the time one has 30 years of riding experiences. the likelyhood of being killed on a motorcycle is lower that the likelyhood of being struck by lightning. Restricting power for, lets say, a year, seems to make sense, but hard data would help.
 

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You've got to understand that in Australia each state sets its own rules about learner riders. New South Wales has had power to weight laws for a while. Personally, I think it is far more sensible than the old system that restricted capacity to 250cc and saw those bikes being sold at ridiculously high prices. Now, for example, you can learn to ride on a Ducati Monster 620 with a restrictor and, when you have your full licence, simply remove the restrictor.



Still, the motorcycle paranoia exists as is evident in the illogical facts argument represented in the article. Even on the slowest, most underpowered bike you would be just as dead in a head-on accident. Australian drivers are amonst the worst I have ever encountered. They should put their efforts into driver education and awareness rather than blaming the victims.

 

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Its something at least. Here we just pretend there is no problem. I would limit availability of bikes to novices by hp and not cc's . Here every spring a lot of young riders get killed on sport bikes. Often when I read the report it happens in an area that I know is a bad area or road to go fast on. If these riders had two years under their belts they would probably know that and maybe still be around today.
 

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Coming from New South Wales in Aus I can state that this has been the case for quite a few years and most people I talk to seem pretty happy. Used to be up to 250 but is now more sensibly a power to weight ratio and as has been mentioned Ducati 620 monster and BMW 650 fit into these requirements. And yes there are lots of loony stats thrown around to try to get us off the road including an article in the Australian Financial Review a few months back arguing that we should be taxed off the road.
 

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This doesn't seem too bad when compared to Europe, where 125cc/15bhp is the norm. At least with 150kW/tonne you'll be allowed 35-40bhp on a full-sized bike, and that's enough for 80mph cruising on highways. Always knew that old Beemer R60/6 (40 bhp, 200kgs, fits the rules exactly) would come in handy for something...
 

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I love the Aussie common sense approach.

The plan - developed with the SA Road Safety Advisory Council's Motorcycle Task Force - makes 21 recommendations, including:



"EXPANDING the use of high-skid resistant water-based pavement markings on roads.



UPGRADING roadside rest areas to be more amenable for motorcyclists.



IMPLEMENTING an improved training model to complement the licensing system for motorcycle riders. "



 

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Ahh, Don’t politicians make their new laws sound so simple. Again the majority must suffer the more excruciating restrictions because of a few, who, regardless of the law will still ride like idiots.( Haven’t we all been teenagers ?) They always have and always and will. And what’s the bull***** about rest areas, most accidents happen in and around the metropolitan areas not out on the open roads. There are already more than enough places to stop for a rest. Now if there was some sort of licensing coordination between the 6 states and 2 territories it could be less frustrating when you can move interstate without having to change licences. A good start would be if all cities encouraged motorcyclists by providing basic things like plenty of motorcycle parking bays instead of treating them like second-class citizens.
 

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Great idea

Sounds like a great idea, too many new bikers riding the latest 600cc or 1000cc race rep bike neither of which make a good first bike.

Went riding one weekend with two guys, me on my Buell XB12S another with an old worn out GS500 Suzuki, and a guy new to riding on a new Kawaskai 636 Ninja.

All went pretty well till we got out to Canyon lake which has a really twisty road and we left the new guy on the 636 so far behind we both stopped to wait and waited so long we thought he went down. The guy didn't even know about counter-steering, now is this some one that should be riding a 636 Ninja?

I don't think so.
 

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It would be nice if the industry would give some of the euro bikes to the usa.But that is not likely to happen.Like the new suzuki gsr 600 ,nice ergoes etc.Someone I know has a nice 400 viffer.Yep a 400 he bought in japan.
 

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I've been in the arguement before... I sell motorcycle insurance for a living and based on Euro and English data there is a reason to limit the bikes. Basically, if you follow the English guidelines and keep 16 & 17 yo kids off of anything over 125 cc and up to 21 yo off of anything over 500 cc we (the consumer) will see a drastic shift in premiums for certain bikes. If you are over 21 and a beginner you would be limited to 250-500 cc bikes for two years. They base alot of the driving program in England on power output. As such, it could be slightly modified here to allow for our interstate system. Also, it would open the market to some of the coolest low cc bikes on the market. Anyone ever really look at an Aprilia rs125? Very cool bike. There are dozens of 50-250 cc bikes that America never sees. They all meet Euro III emmisions. How much different are the EPA standards? Probably not much.
 

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Wouldn't legislating limits by HP simply encourage the inexperienced to ride a 1,500 cc Harley, which only puts out 70 some odd HP but weighs 700 + lbs and puts out oodles of torque? I agree with your post, but wonder whether weight or performance limits in combination would work.
 
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