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That is a sweet bike. It looks like there is a catalytic converter or something at the collector, maybe its set to come to the US at some point. CARB blows.
 

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So I'm wondering, is that an enlarged (and detuned, no doubt) Hayabusa engine, or a really bored-out Bandit 1200 type engine? Anyway, not really what I'm looking for, I've already got something like this, though more torque and power couldn't possibly hurt.



The FZ1 came close, I'll have to give one a test ride, but it could use a larger engine and a little more wind protection, maybe some optional lower wind deflectors.
 

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Here is some info lifted from the pommie motor cycle news.



"Suzuki's GSX1400 will be a four-cylinder retro machine designed to compete with 1970s-style musclebikes like Kawasaki's ZRX1200 and Yamaha's XJR1300SP.



But it could out-muscle them all by being one of the most powerful retro-style machines in the world, with around 140bhp and similarly impressive levels of torque.



The bike marks the end of the line for Suzuki's long-serving GSX-R1100-based oil-cooled motor, which is used in the Bandit 1200 and the current GSF1200S.



The replacement design will also be oil-cooled, but is expected to introduce fuel injection to comply with more stringent emissions regulations due to be introduced in many markets soon. Europe's first wave of tighter rules comes into force next year.



Whatever the engine's technological advances, the chassis remains distinctly old-fashioned. The backbone design has a pair of conventional, right-way-up forks bolted to it, with a twin shock set-up at the rear.



The styling will make it look like a pukka 1970s machine, with a bulbous fuel tank, round headlight and chrome megaphone exhausts.



Suzuki will raid its parts bins for wheels, suspension and brakes. They will come from existing models, most probably the GSF1200S.



The bike will probably appear at shows towards the end of the year and go on sale in early 2002 for around £6500 - though Suzuki GB refuses to even acknowledge its existence."



So there you go.
 

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To all the goofballs who are against this bike. Allow all the big bore bikes that can be brought in to come in.You know that some in Washington will see how much fun they are and try and regulate the cc's! It is a clean styled bike that doesn't have all the gaudy fairings like all the other new Jap rockets have. It is differant. I am tired of looking at the local hangouts and seeing hundreds of GSXR750 or CB900 or the all mighty R1. Yawn.I like the fact that Suzuki is doing something differant,and now Yamaha is joining in. We are waiting for Honda to come up with something exciting and stop coming up short!!! I say BRING IT HERE SUZUKI!!!!!!!!!!!! Then i will also be called Bandit1400fast!!!! Whatever you ride keep the shiney side up and just support riding! Thanks
 

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Hey lads



In relation to those pics of the Bandit 1400, it looks to similar to an XJR1300.

Don't get me wrong, that's not a bad thing but they could go the next step and possibly re-release the Katana shape but with the Busa engine or something along those lines

Just like Kawasaki did with the ZRX1100 and that has been really popular due to its styling amongst other things

:eek:)

YZFboy (Yamaha Thunderace 1000)
 

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No, if you look real close you can see GSX 1400 on the side panel. Hard to tell if this is a bored out 1200 or a 'Busa mill made up to look like an aircooled motor though. Hardly anything really new about it, but probably good fun anyway.
 

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If your friends are waiting for the Yamaha FJ1300, it won't be coming to the states or Canada. I was at the motorcycle show in Toronto in early January. A bunch of our group from Cleveland specifically went there to see teh Canadian models/colors, hoping for the FJ. But we didn't find it at Yamaha, and a manufacturer's rep explained that they aren't bringing that model to North America at all.



So you'll have to go to Europe to get an FJ for now.
 

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Re: Why reinvent the wheel?

That's a very good idea. But I think the engine changes (I hate the term detune, I prefer retune) are desired by some people. It is more than the riding position, they may need more power down low, especially if doing any serious touring with lots of luggage or a passenger.

But I would love to have a "touring kit" for my F4. There's been some long rides that I've done where some of the comfort features of that kit would help. But then I'd lose a little of the hard edge.
 

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Good to see you share the same view



Here in Australia it would go off if they did it



Katana's now in restored condition get between 5 and 7 thousand dollars on average



I'd definetly trade the Yam in for one of those if they brought them out again!



Bring it on Suziki!!!
 

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For the torque, you understand. There's a limit to how much torque you can get out of an engine that size. Still, given its lighter weight, it should be quite adequate. Would have been even better if they'd kept the aluminum frame and kept weight down to R1 levels (or a little less, even). Power/weight ratio rules.
 

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Damn straight! There are those of us who enjoy being able to see the engine on a bike - reminding us why these things are called MOTORcycles. Retro styled (like my ZRX) or not (like the Bandit 1200) I say bring on the new standards. I think of these somewhat heavy large displacements retros as competition for the cruisers, but more useful. Ditto the modern standards, as more usable competition for the sporty bikes.
 
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