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First Post!!!

Sounds like the altenator is not keeping up and you are running mostly on the battery. I've encountered a similar situation on one of my bikes-same symptoms. The other possibility is shorted cell in the battery that is drawing down the charge system. A heavy current draw would affect the FI/Ignition at low RPMS due to inadequate system voltage.
 

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You didn't say what year your Duc is. The first couple of years had charging system issues. Go to the st2 owners' group on Yahoo for a great FAQ on ST's as well as a sympathetic ear/ shoulder for leaning.
 

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First off check for loose or dirty battery teminals,or very low fluid levels,it could be that simple.

If they are all fine, put a voltmeter on and see if the alternator is putting out a consistant charge when the engines running.If it is,you could have a dud cell in the battery.In a cold climate with inconsistant use of the bike ,the battery's can clag out pretty quickly.
 

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I once had a ST2 (1997). Since the bike sounds like it is losing current to keep everything working, the most likely canidates are: battery, alternator, and regulator/recifier. After u checked for lose battery terminals etc, I may be work having a look at the wiring around the regulator recifier to see the state/colour of the wires - do they look burnt out? As posted here, grab a digital multimeter, hope onto a forum for ducs and they will tell you how to do continuity tests on the alternator and regulator/recifier.





 

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sounds like electrical power issues. the battery terminals is the best place to start, look for corrosion and signs of arcing clean em up tighten em down and give them a light coating of dielectric grease on the exterior (not the mating surfaces) if the terminals are clean and tight then you either have a charging problem or a bad battery.



The Clicking noise your starter is making is indicative of a dead battery. the noise is the solinoid opening and closing when the starter draws more current than the batt has to offer.



If you were able to drive home after a push start your charging system is probably working, a modern bike draws a lot of power and if you were running solely on the batt you would not have made it far

test the battery voltage both with the bike off and running. off should be between 12-13 vdc and running should be higher and stable, ~14. if the battery is weak, less than 12 volts you can see if it will take a tricle charge (one or two amps for a several hours. If the voltage is the same or lower when the bike is running as when it is off you have charging woes, beter bring it in.

Here in the states most auto parts stores have battery and alternator test equipment and will be happy to help you diagnose your problem, as I can only guess as to the situation in switzerland this is just a sugestion. good luck with the duc,

Greg
 

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Well "bike sputtering" is not a problem. "Front tire stuck to the radiator" would be a problem. Or "left leg missing, probably on the front bumper of that beige -74 Austin Allegro we met at the hairpin".



To correct the sputtering I think the rider should go to an optician. He failed to see that there are Japanese bikes in the market, with better quality, performance and reliability.



- cruiz-euro

 

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Right when I first got my ST4, I was out riding and was having similar problems. The nut backed of the stator and essentially I was running on battery power only. The bump start worked about once and then the battery was completely dead and I had to have it towed.



Once at the dealer, I found out that tightening the nut was part of a Ducati service bulletin for the 6000 mile valve service but mine fell off at 4500.



No problems since.
 

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Re: Excellent point

If reliability is what you're after you should have bought a Triumph Sprint, statisticaly one of the most reliable bikes on the road and also some of the highest owner satisfaction ratings.
 

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Let me get this straight.



1. This is your first bike.

2. You have no mechanical skills.

3. You bought a Ducati.



You sir, are completely bonkers. Take it to your dealer, and learn an expensive lesson in economics.
 

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Agreed it sounds electrical. You might want to know that the low voltage connector to the starter solenoid can be easily dislodged while mucking around with the fairing lowers, and will knock out the starter. Also consider junking the crap Ducati clutch slave in favour of a Yoyodyne or similar, whatever year your ST2. Mine failed twice (2001) and died slowly the second time, dripping DOT4 on the o-ring chain which, from my experience, doesn't much care for getting lubed with brake fluid. Very expensive lesson! Otherwise, the bike is pretty durable not to mention gorgeous.
 

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If you can find the battery and have about seven tools, you probably have enough to check & clean the battery connections. You can buy one of those cheapo trickle chargers for maybe tweny bucks here in the states, they must have them over there too. You might be sure the battery has water while you're at it. Everyone says used distilled, but if you don't have any, many a battery has gotten by on regular. Let it trickle charge for a good long time. Then, take a ride, with somebody able to follow you if it dies again the next few times you ride. Charging systems can certainly go south on any machine, but batteries have a lifespan too. The last one I bought cost fifty or sixty bucks. You mentioned riding in Switzerland, which probably means that it sat all winter. That's hell on a bike, especially the battery. Trickle chargers can help with that sort of thing, but there are other things that need to be done to properly winterize a bike. Being a pampered Californian, I don't know much about that stuff. (I just fire the thing up and ride it eight or ten miles every week or two) but some of our battle hardened easterners can probably tell you what ought to be done if it's going to sit for a few months.
 
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