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The new Goldwings are so much more powerful and heavier than the bike you rode years ago that I would strongly recommend that you purchase something smaller and less powerful to polish up your skills on. Try finding a used Suzuki 500 twin and progress up from there. I'm almost 56 years old and have been riding continuously for forty years. I’ve just seen way to many riders in our age group get hurt by buying a large heavy motorcycle after years of not riding.
 

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Great advice. To me learning to ride on a Goldwing would be like learning to fly with a 747... Think Cessna 150 or 172 i.e. Suzuki 500 twin.
 

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Hi! I am 71 and started riding at 18 so I have many good bikes under my belt. All time favorite was probably my Moto Guzzi 850-t3 Police version..



My current ride is an Aprilia Atlantic 500 maxi-scooter with easy step through design, 100 mph top speed, CVT transmission (shiftless) 55-60 mpg, super cushie seat and lots of under the seat stowage.



These maxi-scooters are thousands of dollars less than the big bikes, insurance costs are lower, weight is lower, and the "fun" factor is superb.



Look at Honda's SilverWing, Suzuki Burgman 650 and 400, Yamaha Majesty, and of course Aprilia's Scarabeo, Piaggio's X9 and Beverly. All of these are excellent long distance tourers and great around town at the same time. I have to add that these are "NOT" your grandmothers puny little 50cc Vespas, but full sized performance machines with more goodies than you will ever find on a motorcycle at twice the price.



Skip the Goldwing and go for the Burgman 650, the current "king of the hill."
 

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Good point about the class... Definitely a great idea...
 

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Why not another 350 Honda? I've got one around here somewhere...



But seriously get yourself something that'll be easy to pick up. A new Goldthing would require a sky-crane to get righted again. You might need a truss if you dropped it in a parking lot and tried to pick it up.



Small & light.
 

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F-4's! I was a PR in VF33 off the Indy. Loved them F4J's.



You know F4's can't fly without those big J79's.



What'd you fly? The B model? (Little skinny tires and the IR raydome).
 

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Just to remind you this is motorcycle.com... not scooter.com... Just kidding. You are right about scotters I saw a Silver Wing the other day looked cool and fun...I rode a little scooter 50cc once but I wonder how it translates to learning to ride a Goldwing. I guess all two wheelers use counter steering...But other than that wouldn't a motorcycle be better...i.e. since you are strandling a motorcycle like a horse vs the scooter perched approach?
 

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aw come on, the 'wing is so wide I don't think it can tip more than about twenty degrees. anyways no bike is fun to pick up, but if you lean your back into the bike and push up with your legs nearly anyone can right any bike, the tricky part is the pirouette when you get it to the balance point.
 

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Your weight when leaning into a turn is firmly headed into the seat, so it should be just as fun on a scoot as on a bike.



If one is concerned about deteriorated skills, though, scooters can be a godsend. CVT means no shifting or clutch, which is the hardest thing for newbies to grasp. Those first few months are hair-raising enough that taking away some of the things one normally has to concentrate on just frees up more mental power for actually riding.



My girlfriend, for example, has enough trouble driving in her automatic cage and I would be terrified of her learning to drive a stick, let alone a bike.
 

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Re: Freshen Up Those Riding Skills

Welcome back! Since you last threw a leg over a bike, there have been a lot of improvements to bikes and the sport, and one of them is the availability of Motorcycle Safety Foundation rider courses. The MSF Beginning Rider Course (available through junior colleges and municipal recreation programs) provides you with a day in the classroom followed by a day on a closed course on a small bike (around 250cc) supplied by the school. This will give you a good grounding in basic skills before you go out shopping for a bike. After you take the beginner course, you might want to polish your skills on something quite a bit lighter and easier to handle than a Wing -- maybe something in the 500 to 750cc range. Build up your skill and confidence for a few thousand miles, and then you can decide whether you want to make the leap to a big tourer. Good luck and happy trails!
 

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Why a Goldwing? Are you interested in touring? If no touring or camping is planned, you may consider something less bulky like an ST or Buell's Ulysses.



But, if you have to have a Goldwing there is an instructional video out there done by some Florida or Cal motorcycle cop. He demostrates how to maneuver those monsters at parking lot speeds without tipping them over. MO may have the video review in their archives.



"First time rider"? Once you throw your leg over a bike , it's all going to come back in a couple of short rides. And I really don't think your going to drop any bike. Just remember kickstands and brake locks. You know, pre-fight stuff.



Good Luck!







 

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Excellent advice, especially with the past riding experience he mentioned. He might also want to consider a 750-800cc cruiser, low and easy to move around. Yami/Kawi/Suz?Honda all have good choices. Unless he wants to spend up to a harley.
 
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