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A lot of dealers prefer to get you to use their financing. Perhaps they just don't want you to use another credit union.



I only bought one new bike, and it was through Honda's financing, so I got no such attitude.
 

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Take all the necessary cash with you in a suitcase. Say, "I'd like to buy that now.", and open the bag. I bet they still won't bite.



It's like trying to buy a Big Mac without being offered fries. "Say! You're right! I would like some fries with that, now you mention it. Why didn't I think of it?"
 

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Hmm... this is interesting Ive experienced the same problem with cage dealers...I think they dont like money yeah thats it there commies and dont like money...my wife must not be a commie she always takes my money without question or permission now that I think about it...
 

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Commies?



Bod, you are dating yourself.

I haven't heard anyone use "Commies" in about 20 years now. (Back in my Regan Navy days!)



I have to proudly say that I was thrown out of my local Suzuki dealer (Springfield Suzuki/Kawasaki) in 1998 and have not been back! I went in with cash in hand to buy a new TL1000R, at full boat, "first on my block to own one" and the dealer was/is a total **** to me.



The owner was puting tags on the jet ski handlebars, and the parts guy was standing at the parts counter. A "salesman" was talking to a looker about a cruiserbike.



By this time several other people had came in and were looking at bikes, and a mother with her son was at the parts counter. After standing around for about 15 minutes while being ignored, I asked the owner for some help with the TL1000R, as they had 3 of them, 2 blues, and one yellow, and I wanted to buy one.



His response? the salesman will be with me when he is done helping his customer!



This REALLY pissed me off, so I asked in a rather loud voice, did he know if there was still a Suzuki dealer in Marionville, and was it open on Saturday mornings, as I wanted to buy a TL1000R, and maybe they had one that they wanted to sell.



I wound up buying a Moto Guzzi Sport 1100 from a motorcycle Dealer in Mt. Vernon, Ohio.

I have never have been back into a Suzuki dealership since then.



I think the Guzzi was a good choice, as I am now really into bikes with 'Character" like 1/2 turn throttles with springs that make a Studebaker clutch spring seem weak!



Oh well, that is why dealers get a bad reputation.



By the way, I have bought several bikes on E-bay, and LOVE it. No dealer BS, and you get what you want, at the price you are willing to pay, and not a penny more.



Mark
 

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Speaking as a person who knows several car salesmen, I know that dealers usually make more money by financing the car through their own credit company than they make in profit selling the car (or bike), especially on the lower price (and profit) ones. Thats why they want you to finance it through them. The problem is that the interest rates at the dealers usually suck, as they are usually several points higher than you could get through a bank or credit union. And many use deceptive financing tactics, forcing their customers to pay rates more than twice the current rate.
 

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Super Duper Mod Man
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How you are financing is probably bugging them. I'm sure if you were using the dealer approved financing, those problems would go away. Still surprised they would possibly lose a sale over a small amount of cash.
 

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You think that's bad. Try buying a motorcycle with a credit card! They will tell you to F.O. I am amazed that so many dealerships with such poor customer service continue to stay in business. I think it's testimony to the motorcycle market in general the past several years; high demand. However, when the bust comes, those dealerships that have excellent customer service stand the best chance to survive. In the meantime, I think whenever a negative experience occurs that a letter of complaint should be fired out to the company. But how many of us do that? I know I should have sent letters in the past but of course after I left the dealer, I cooled off and blew it off.
 

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Number one -- always, always complain in writing. The results can sometimes be very surprizing, and sometimes justice is served.

Write two letters, one to the dealership manager / owner and one to a manufacturer rep. Make sure they each know that you sent the same letter to the other. Usually there's a regional manager or someone like that and it's easy to find an address. If you're really annoyed, write to the national sales organization. I personnaly will also write to the highest person in the organization I can find. Once in a while it will be like a black hole but usually you get some response.

Remember to keep the letter polite, professional and factual, and stick to the incident in question. Use spell check for goodness sake!

You might toss in the question -- if this is how customers can expect to be treated at this dealership why should I or anyone else ever go back?

 

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Perhaps they have had a lot of 'customers' who don't come back after starting the paperwork? Still, I'd think that even the busiest place would want to take an immediate look at a customer who walks in ready to buy on their own terms and with financials handled, if only because that's how I do it.



I wonder if there's some legal downside to taking the check for the full price before prep & final delivery - perhaps they become liable for things beyond the obvious situations, like damage to the bike while it's in their posession.



All that aside, I'm sure they make a TON of money on those in-house financing deals and hate to give them up. As for credit cards, you must remember that VISA/MC charge something like 1.75% of the transaction, which will eat into your profit margins pretty quickly.



OTOH- I bought a Buell Blast in 2000, and let the dealer keep my $100 deposit in return for putting it on a card (at 4.99%) when it arrived a month early. $4500 x 1.75% equals about $79, folks. Plus, he may have kept the deposits of the folks who were on the waiting list before me and passed on buying the bike.



I sure don't feel at all guilty about walking into a dealership with outside financing in hand. :)

 

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I can actually sympathize with the dealer on this one. Credit card companies take 2 or 3% of the charge total, and on a big ticket item that can turn into real money. I don't accept Visa at my business for this very reason. Amex has an even higher fee, which is why fewer stores accept it.
 

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Somewhere, somehow, there is this belief if you walk in with "cash" the dealer will roll out the red carpet. That's just not the case unless your credit score is 452.



There's more money to be made on the back end than the front. If you pay for a bike with cash the dealer makes whatever profit is built into the purchase price and you're gone forever. If I can get a wholesale interest rate and mark it up a couple of points I'll make money for five years. I might even give you a better deal on the bike.



You could always keep your cash at home. Finance the bike through the dealer (getting a better price in the process) and when the first payemnt comes in the mail, call the bank and ask for the payoff amount. Then use your cash.
 

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Re: That's how they get you

I've never bought a new bike.. always a 2x hand. Tell me if this logic is solid... So I agree to whatever terms factory-financing offers. Check that there is no early payment penalty and then take deal to my credit union for a re-finance. I did this with my cage- they were happy to do it and it didn't cost me any money and very little time. Did I miss something?
 

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After a short stint.. of 16 years.. in the corporate world, I have been selling motorcycles in a large multi-line dealership in Southern CA for about 3 years. I would have shaken your hand and said congratulations with a smile on my face to boot!



Either there is something else to this story or the dealer was wrong. It is relatively common for people to pay cash for bikes where the dealer makes no "back end' profit on the financing. You are a customer and your method of payment is up to you.



I must admit when I got into the industry, I expected to sell to fellow motorcyclists with a passion for the sport most of the time. Instead it has been my experience that a lot of consumers want to come in "grind" the salesperson for the last $50 with no concern for the person helping them because they can get it on the internet or three states away for less.



Lucky for me there are enough people in my area that appreciate the level of service I give them and are happy to pay me for it. If you want to get the absolute lowest price, by all means go for it. Just try to understand that if you go to a retail store and spend a month of weekends with someone who provides test rides and answers all your questions just to buy it somewhere else, the bad Karma is on you.



OK, I'll stop ranting now.
 

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I understand the implications of dealers having to pay the percentage of purchase back to the credit card companies. The bottom line is that because of demand on most bikes, the dealership can get away with the practice of refusing to accept a credit card for motorcycle purchases or prioritizing sales based upon the potential to have their products financed. As I said, if dealerships focused more on customer service and were more upfront with customers or even had written policies regarding credit vs. cash vs. credit cards, I think they would make more customers happy and generate more return business. But because of the motorcycle market in general, dealers can and do resort to tactics that maximize their potential profit (and don't get me wrong, I believe in market economics). But let's see how these dealerships fare if/when the motorcycle market highsides. Maybe I'm just being idealistic though. Just my $0.02.
 

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When I bought a Harley in 1988 at HD of Salt Lake they very enthusiastically took my check for the full amount. This was before the yuppie/rubbie BS that's made the HD market such a joke.



One way to avoid the dealer BS is to buy used bikes. Let someone else take the depreciation. It's the best way to buy cars too. Of course for sportbikes it's not an option since they go obsolete in a few weeks and most of the owners abuse them so heavily that the used ones aren't worth spit anyhow.
 
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