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Well Freddie Spencer was a world champion. I do not think you will regret going to his school. He may provide further insight to your skill. Even though you may incorporate Code's style, it does not mean what Freddie teaches will be incompatible. The more aspects of riding you study, in my opinion, the more diverse your skills
 

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The more you learn, the better you get (hopefully). Learn different styles and techniques, get lots of practice, and find what works best for you. This works for everything, not just bike riding.
 

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There was an in depth review of Keith's, Freddie's and Kevin's racing schools by Jason Colon (that's right but it has a ' over the second "o") in Sport Bike magazine. Unfortunately I lost the cover so I can't tell you what issue it was but I bought it around September, 2005. Most of the writers seem to be the same as on Cycle World so I assume it is the same publisher. The publisher is Hachette Filipachi Media U.S. Inc., 1663 Broadway, NY NY. Editorial and production offices at 1499 Monrovia Ave., Newport Beach Ca 92663. Phone at that office is 949/720-5300. I didn't see a contact for back issues. If you can't find it, I could fax or snail mail you a copy. Send your co-ordinates to me by email :

***[email protected] where ***= tim
 

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The best thing to do is call or e-mail Freddie Spencer or someone at the school and tell him you've been through the 14 step process at Keith Code's school and what advantages are there to the Superbike school.



FS claims to teach a system that helps you learn new bikes, and new tracks to get you up to speed quickly. It might be a complement to what you've learned already about the different components that make you faster going through a corner.
 

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It's my understanding that Freddie's school covers some more advanced techniques than any other school, especially in the areas of trailbraking and proper rear brake use. I went to three of Keith's schools (admittedly a while ago) and was rather unimpressed with his attitude and instruction. I felt it was really geared towards somewhat new riders (expecially to a track). I really hated the fact he runs three groups instead of two. To pay that kind of money and spend a third of your time sitting on your can doing nothing is a complete rip-off. The only thing it benefits is Keith's pocketbook. I enjoyed Reg Pridmore's CLASS school much more. They, too, were geared more toward sttreet riding. I think that Freddie's school teaches the most advanced material and can benefit anyone who rides street or track. If I could afford it, I'd be headed his way to absorb all that he and Nick have to offer. Hope this helps. Enjoy the ride. Cheers, Jack
 

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I just attended Freddie's School in November. It really isn't a race school but a high performance riding school. I found out that the high performance refers to the rider as well as the bike. It was awesome, especially the ride behind Freddie. That short ride gave me huge insight to his techniques.

There were other students in the class who had attended Keith's school. Both of them indicated that the approach between Freddie's School and Keith's were radically different.

In response to some "who is right and who is wrong" questions from these folks, the school personnel at Freddie's school, including Freddie himself, took great pains to NOT badmouth Keith, his school or his methods or any of the other schools for that matter. They did say that there were some fundamental differences in the approaches taught by Keith and by Freddie. The trailbraking approach used at Freddie's School allows me to feel in greater control at all times on the bike. I don't feel that I am just a passenger at times.



The expense of Freddie's school does include the use of a 600RR for both days. (A great bike! Stable, handles great and plenty of power) I don't think that the price of Keith's school does (I might be wrong on that though.)



I got a great deal of solid understanding of chassis dynamics and how those effect the handling of a modern sportbike. There was also quite a bit of information about why the techniques taught were important out on the street in terms of keeping the bike in control and maintaining the ability to stay safe.



I have been riding for more than fifteen years but had not attended a school (I don't count MSF because of its different focus). I learned a great deal which has changed the way I ride in a fundamental way. I feel safer and more in control. I was able to explore limits that I could not do on the street.



I was extremely pleased that I attended and plan on going back for the level 2 course. (Expensive is a relative thing as I see it. Avoiding one trip to the emergency room and a wrecked bike because of training would more than pay for a lot of training no matter whose it is. Not to mention avoiding physical pain and insurance increases.



And on a loosely related matter Freddie's School is in Las Vegas and Keith's is where? :) Las Vegas has cheap flights and hotel rooms so the costs is reasonable in that respect. I suggest that if you go on a Thursday/Friday session you stay the weekend and have some fun.



 

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First, I have taken several of Keith's schools, along with reading his books. This is probably key, since I bought into what he teaches, therefore it helped me immensely.



Second, in response to comments about Freddie having been fast himself, please note that almost all teachers of any sport were not superstars themselves. This is not to say Freddie doesn't have great teaching skills, but he may have abilities that he takes for granted that Keith had to work to accomplish. I am not doggin Freddie's school, since I haven't taken it, nor have I read anything he has written. I just get tired of listening to people say "he was fast, so he knows what he is talking about". That statement is a bad approach, since most coaches in Baseball or Football were only average athletes. Quite often the harder you work to achieve something, even if you don't approach the top level, indicates your understanding of what needs to be done. If you disagree with this one, ask a true rocket scientist to explain gravity or the theory of realitivity. Most likely it will go straight over your head.



Third, review material by each, then decide. This is evident by the comment that someone really enjoyed the "Class" school, which I took as well. Since it was far earlier in my riding than the Keith Code school, I would have thought I would learn a great deal, which I did not.



Based on how much I enjoyed different countries I worked in, I believe a large portion of it depends on your attitude. Yes, I am implying that the more you expect, the harder it is to reach your goals. One clear example of this personally is how I enjoyed Malaysia more than Australia. During my stay in each country, I realized that if I had to choose a place to live, Australia would have won hands down. If you expect to learn, you will. If you expect to become an instant superstar, you will be overly disappointed irrespective of which school you take.
 

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I agree with the comment that Keith Code has his eye on the $$ no matter what.

I signed up for one of Code's classes, only to experience a flat on my way to the class. No way to contact anyone, and by the time I got my bike home, the class was practically over.

I sent Code a letter explaining the situation and asked for a refund. No way, Jose. That experience convinced me that $$ come befor anything else in Code's realm.
 

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A few months after my return to riding (too soon, IMHO, as I didn't have the basics down), I took the three-day camp at Freddie Spencer's. About a year later, I did a two-day Level 1 & 2 at Code's. The schools are similar, but different. You won't forget what you learned at Code's when you go to Freddie's, but you will have to put it "on hold" during the class and try what they're telling you, rather than what you learned before.



I think Code's is much more street oriented, and the material is better organized and better presented. But at Freddie's, they'll teach you to hang off right off the bat, and they'll teach you to trail brake. Both useful skills, and fun to learn. Freddie is a big believer in steering the bike with your body, and Keith isn't. And the things that are the same will be a good refresher and breaker of bad habits.



Assuming you're flying there, you won't need to rent a car for Freddie's. They run a shuttle bus to their preferred hotel.
 

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If you can afford any school do it..
 

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Seems to me better to do track days with a local sport group-learn it with YOUR bike. I did WERA over twenty years ago (Seca 400) and loved it, but am really looking forward to spring and Pocono with Team Pro-Motion. Since my early days I did the common progression to bigger, faster up to 1994 (FZR1000). 2005 R6 appreciated more than the Fizzer. R6 stolen this June, got a nekkid SV650 late October (2006) loved it MORE. 2000 miles in 5 weeks. Real world performance on par with the R6-the SVee doesn,t feel any less powerfull. 40-80 roll on actually a tick faster! Consider track days, the instructers are doing it more for love than money and you WILL find some very accomplished riders. Personally I would choose Fast Freddie if I went that route.
 
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