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I have to admit that the Royal Enfield has some appeal to me - but not as my primary bike. I would invest in some tools and a bike lift at the same time - and consider the wrenching a new hobby. With a good break-in, and some debugging time it might develop into a reliable ride - at any rate, you could count on it as a conversation starter... :) ... Come to think of it, if they would begin building vintage bug-eye Sprites in India, I could be a prospect for them as well.



Cheers from Pensacola, FL
 

· The Toad
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Re: Fact of the Matter...

I applaud your willingness to tinker with the Bullet. I enjoy tinkering with old bikes also. However I've got enough trouble keeping a '39 Plymouth and a '71 Cutlass Convertible running to bite off a Royal Enfield as well. I'm sticking with more modern two wheelers until I can pickup a shovelhead basket case. Of course then I'll have to sell both the Plymouth and the Cutlass to have enough time to keep a Shovel running.
 

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Re: Arrogance (and ignorance)

>Don't confuse reliability with being

>maintenance free, since they aren't identical.

This is a very good point. Another thing that people often confuse is reliability vs. durability - two entirely different things.

- cruiz-euro
 

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I've ridden one of these - the local dealer is a mate. If you like authentic vintage motorcycles - and I mean really authentic, compete with authentic engineering, brakes, handling, power, controls, vibration and oil leaks, then the Enfield is for you. However, if you ride it hard (and hard for an Enfield means keeping up with traffic), especially on motorways or freeways, which didn't exist when the Bullet was first built, it will invariably vibrate itself to bits very quickly.



If you want something similar, but better screwed together and with all the reliability and engineering problems dialled out, get that Kawasaki W650 old brit clone. You can use that as practical transport without it falling to bits, but you still probably wouldn't want to, since it's still dog slow.



If you want the 'look and feel' of an old brit bike, but with modern performance parameters, buy a modern Triumph Bonneville.



The Enfield will go on for ever, provided you potter about at 45mph max, and can be maintained with two spanners and a lump hammer, but having ridden one, you'd need to pay me to own one!
 

· The Toad
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I've seen an Ariel Square 4 twice in the Torrance area. The last I saw it was about 10 years ago in Lomita. So I know there are Ariel Square 4s around that one could score if one was wealthy enough and lucky enough to find one for sale.



Hmmmm... luck usually is associated in aquiring good things. Scratch that "lucky". Except maybe that he was lucky that it ran those two times.



One could make a major Zen meditation on the concept of luck and Britbikes. Somewhere in there must be the resolution to all the problems of life in the universe.
 

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Re: Fact of the Matter...

...No worries as I think you should be proud of your technological heritage... Many americans don't understand that the present day engineering/techno center is in India (especially educationally speaking, their manufacturing sector will soon catch up and reflect that)... But what do you expect from a country full of Dodge trucks with bumper stickers on them that still say, "buy American?" ~Namaste~
 

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If you are not aware of it my now you will have to dive into this bike yourself. All of us with old Brit bikes, of which this Indian bike is an exact replica have to work on our bikes ourselves or we'll never be able to ride them. Alright, the front forks are easy. Support the front end of the bike and pull off the forks. You will need to unscrew the threaded cover and pull the top tube out. The fork seal will need to be popped out with a screw-driver. You know what? Get a manual on this bike. Buy the tools they recommend. Find a spares supplier - there are lots of them - the dealer will help you. Get back online when you are in a jam. Don't give up, it's the most fun you'll have in the garage.



I bought my first big bike in 1975 - a 1970 650 Tiger and it is still my favorite bike. I know every nut and bolt on it and it's the easiest machine to work on and has never (NEVER) been hauled to a shop to be fixed, nor has it ever left me stranded in over 40,000 miles. Something I can't say about any other bike I've owned, mostly Jap bikes, Harleys and a new Triumph.
 
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