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Let me get this straight. You want to tow a motor cycle with the 300 lb rated tow hitch on your motor home? There are so many questions as to how and why that I don't quite know where to start.
 

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I did something similar (many) years ago - I had a friend weld some large washers on (also large) eyebolts, which I then bolted to the bumper on my MGB. I drilled holes around 5/8" - eyebolt diameter - on the top of the bumper, spaced the same distance apart as my fork legs, then added smaller eyebolts on the extreme "corners" of the bumper. I removed the front wheel on my '66 Triumph TR6 and slid the axle through the eyebolts to attach the bike to the bumper, then ran (tight) lines from the top of the forks to the more widely-spaced smaller eyebolts to keep the bike from moving. It actually worked great - that's how I moved to Berkeley (from SoCal) for college, and I also did it with my Rickman Weslake several years later. I just had to come up with a reasonable story to explain the four holes in my bumper to the guy that bought my MG.
 

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There's a company out there that makes a motorcycle hitch thingy that plugs right into the receiver. It could easily hold a dual sport or small sportbike or cruiser. The bike sits sideways on the back.



This method could be better than trailering because in some states (California) the max speed limit is 55 when towing a trailer and 70 without.



What was your question again?
 

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Versahaul makes a hitch that can carry 600lbs. It requires a class 3 receiver that has a maximum tongue weight of also 600lb. Most large SUVs and pickups can handle this and still cruise at 70-80 mph.

Versahaul.com
 

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I used to tow my dirt bike on the back of my '63 Dodge Dart many times. I bolted a piece of channel iron to the bumper. removed the front wheel and slid the axle thru to holes in the channel iron. Tie downs from the handle bars to the ouside of the bumper kept it vertical. It would be best to remove the chain from the rear sprocket and tie it out of the way. If you don't do this the transmission can easily sieze since it isn't getting the normal lubrication. Backing up can get pretty hairy because of the fork angle so being able to see the bike while you back up is absolutely necessary.
 

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Did anyone actually read the post?

bowtydaddy is looking for BIKE suggestions under 350#, he's got the hauling thing mostly figured out. Or am I the one on crack? Two come to mind:

DRZ400S

KLX400

Actually, that's ONE comes to mind isn't it...
 

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Re: Did anyone actually read the post?

Bowtydaddy weighs 210 lbs. The KLX250 sounds like a good recipe for an over-sized man on an under-sized motorcycle to me.

Heads-up for an avalanche of "a 350 used to be a BIG bike" posts...
 

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What you gonna use the bike for.? If you're planning light trail rides and to/from campground runs ,a KLX250 will be fine. I weigh 215 and ive had a blast on my neighbor's KLX. A Suzook 400 would be nicer for more aggressive riding and higher speed street riding but you maybe pushing your 350 lb aggregate limit a little too much. by the way my old XT 225 was fun too...you canstill find good used ones cheap.
 
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