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As an owner of one of these beasts, I've noted the bike slips back a gear every once in a while. Does the dashboard show the gear position moving back to N? I've noted when it does slip out, I've been lazy with the shift, not being forceful enough with the shift.



Also, You've not stated whether it does this in any other gear. Mine does, again, only if being lazy with the shift, and not forcefully engaging the gear. I've since moved my shifter down, so that it matches the natural rotation of my ankle, and the missed shift occurances have decreased (not totally gone away). I don't want to come accross like I'm beating the crap out of my shifter, but I'm definitely being more deliberate than on my GSXR. The old sabre just needs this kind of attention to my understanding.



BTW, I kind of like the "old dog" still after all these years.



canuck les
 

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Similar Problem...

A friend of mine had a Honda Sabre around the same year as yours. Whenever i rode it, i noticed the same thing that your describing.

Between 2nd and 3rd gear it would 'pop' into neutral. Of course i was riding the bike pretty hard, had to keep up with the newer bikes ya know. :)

The only way i could avoid the problem was to just take it easy on the bike. Calm lazy riding. Then the problem wouldnt occur very often at all.

We never took the the bike in to get looked at or anything. Sorry i have no answers beyond that.

Roland
 

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After much knowledge and research, it turns out that you are riding a '82 Sabre. What are you thinking?

PLEASE DISCONTINUE USE IMMEDIATELY!

Take a bus to your local dealer, and purchase a motorcycle that was designed sometime in the last two decades.



I hope this helps!
 

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This was a problem commonly seen on the Spagthorpe OW-404 from the late 40's. Although not common knowledge, Honda actually based much of their 80's motorcycle engineering on this little-known, but highly regarded firm's product line, and it stood them in good stead until the early 90's when a trio of engineers defected from Harley-Davidson so that they could flex their technological muscles in a nation where it is common practice for men to be bathed in public by young women. Their lead engineer for the project, Dr. Wilfred "Mike" Hailwood, spent countless hours in development of the transmissions and found, after much jiggery-pokery, that high crankcase pressures, caused by failing to bleed out the drier "winter air" that seeps in during storage, was responsible for oxidation of the shifting forks and dogs. thus leading to the afrementioned failure.



Happy to help.
 

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Seems to me like he was asking for help fixing his current bike, not getting a new one. Maybe you should read a bit closer next time so you get all of the relevant details.



In regards to the tranny, it sounds like the gears are not fully meshing, perhaps. You say you are mechanically inclined and have a shop manual, so you might want to open her up and look at the engagement dogs. i am not familiar with the bike specifically, but it will probably have these. They are what actually position the gears inside the case. In many bikes (and cars) they are made of plastic, as they do not get much stress placed on them. All they do is slide the gears along the shaft. They will, however, get worn over time, and so, after a point, they might have worn enough where they are not fully engaging the gear. This could possibly be a very load-sensitive problem. It could also be compounded by case pressure. This would likely explain why it happens sooner under acceleration, and definitely above 6000 rpm. That is one of the first things i would look at.
 

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Have you checked that the shift lever is tightened? I found a similar problem on my old 82 Sabre and simply ensuring the shift lever pinch bolt was tightened properly made a noticeable difference.
 

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Yeah, I know, my bad. I am just thick today. It just sucks having a bike down, so i was trying to be more direct and help him solve his problem, not provide friendly humour
 

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You ever stop to consider that maybe he LIKES his old, low-tech, comfy and moderately powerful bike?
 

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Having worked at a dealership I've seen many of these poor tired 82' Sabre's with this problem. Considering that you wasted $30.00 on the service manual, let it not be a total waste and please turn to the page where the transmission diagram is. Look at 1st - 3rd gears (the tallest and most stressed). If you were to remove them you will find that they are filed down quite nicely from 19 years of riding. Also see the picture of the Shift Fork (looks like a tuning fork)? If you were to also take that out of the bike you will see that it also has been filed down along the insides of the top and bottom forks. Anywho, these all most likely need to be replaced. the gears are no longer able to make a solid contact with each other. Even with regular oil changes after 19 years of riding this ain't bad. Last I checked the gears were $90.00 a piece. In any case if you really want this fixed, you will have to take it to a dealership to get fixed. Although it might end up costing you more then the bike is worth.
 

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This is a not uncommon problem with the early v-fours. Cheer up, there's help. A gentlemen by the name of Dave Dodge ([email protected]) runs a business that specializes in Sabres and Magnas of that vintage and has a transmission recut service that will fix you right up if you send him the old parts. Cost is about $300. Also, get over to http://www.sabmag.org and join the mailing list. It's full of people that know everything there is to know about your bike and local LM's might even be persuaded to help you. Best source of info for Sabres and Magnas on the net. Finally, check out http://www.dirac.org/p/motorcycle/trannyjob/ for an account of the same project on an 84 magna. Basically the same deal.

Make sure you get (and read) a copy of the Sabre/Magna FAQ before you start asking questions on the list....

Good luck.
 
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