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I don't pay much attention to Ducatis but I can imagine that more low-rpm torque would be more pleasant for two-up riding. (Is the ST3 still available? I read some reviews that made it seem like a good balance between the 2 and 4 valve versions.) And yes, two valves should be a bit less expensive to maintain.



Even if there are no peg or seat kits available, you can always take the stock seat to a seatmaker to have some extra foam added. That will improve the seat-to-peg distance a bit for you.
 

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Call your local Ducati dealer and ask the cost of the 600 & 6000 mile service for both the 2v and 4v.

The 4v will be more expensive to maintain.



The ST3 has received great reviews.

I'm a snob, give me the ST4s in grey with red rims.
 

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Many of the ST2 fans buy the two valve model because they can adjust the valves themselves. If you're going to take it to a dealer the cost shouldn't be that much different.



The ST2 might make power at lower revs but the ST4 has a top end hit that is pure magic.



I've toured and ridden two-up plenty on my ST4 and never found it deficient on torque. That's what the tranny is for!



I think Salt Lake Motorsports makes a peg lowering kit. It was made for Gary Eagan as he rode his ST4 more than 100,000 miles.



You know I might have a nice low-mileage ST4 for sale in my garage. Let me check......
 

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Won't that just leave you with the glide and a Ducati sport picture you tore out of a magazine?

Tape it to your bathroom mirror so you can "visualize" it in your garage while you shave.
 

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I haven't put the Duc up for sale yet but I'm considering a garage re-shuffling.



!) Keep the Glide and buy a Sport Classic when available. Although, I can't get that damn Tuono out of my mind.



2) Sell the Glide also and buy a 2006 FJR1300 and only have one bike (perish the thought).
 

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I'm with ya. I'm thinking sell the Multi, buy a dr,klr..etc. Or, sell the Daytona 955i & Multi, buy 1200GS.

I always come back to the FJR and the DL1000 for 1 bike. I think I like the v-strom because it's $8k less than the gs and my off road skills don't exist.

The FJR is way up there. I miss the futura's ability to just eat up hwy miles.
 

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The ST2 has the torque. The ST4 has top-end. The ST3 (which is the replacement for them both, basically) is the blend of both. I have had customers that have had all three machines and the overall winner from a consumer stand point is the ST3. Read any review and you'll notice they are always positive. As far as rear-sets are concerned. There are many companies that will help. Just ask the dealer.
 

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I have raced both 2 and 4 valve ducs. I will never again do that.

if you buy a ducati to ride on the street have a plan B. don't expect it to be cheap or reliable and you won't be disappointed. i had an st2 for awhile too. it was a fun bike to ride. no doubt.

regards

ed
 

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My friend had a brand new ST4 and had lots of problems getting the thing to start when it was warm. Ducati always told him thats just how they are due to the high compression. Still pretty embarissing sitting out in the parking lot trying over and over to get your brand new shiny red, 20K bike to start.



He actually traded it in for an ST3 which always starts right up and he totally loves riding it, that is . . . . when it's not in the shop for oil leaks. It was in the shop for the first 8 out of 10 weeks he had it. A total of 3 different times for severe oil leaks.



So moral of the story, if you want a reliable bike, don't buy Ducati but if you are a die hard Ducati fan, the ST3 seems to be an excellent bike as far as performance goes. Once they got the initial problems worked out, it seems to be reliable now also.
 

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Okay,



I've owned my ST4s for almost three years. No problems except for a dead battery that was my fault. As for hard start problems, Ducati USA replaced the EPROM and the dealer balanced the throttle bodies. The service cost me $10 for shop supplies. This was after the warranty period had expired. The bike has been a joy to own.



CycleCat has adjustable pegs and other cool stuff for Ducs.



The great thing about ST2's is the low price. Folks pass them over because of the two valve engine. On a tight road, you will not miss having that 4 valve kick. In theory, the two valve engines are cheaper to service, but make sure the dealer is charging you for checking valve clearance and not adjusting the clearances. Desmo valves rarely go out of range. Maybe after 12000 miles, one valve will need a shim. DO NOT neglect the belts! In reality, a Duc is not that much more expensive to maintain that other bikes.



Ducatis are better bikes than people want to admit. The folks who bad-mouth them the most are the people who have never owned one or bought used ones that were thrashed. I've owned jap bikes that were pigs.



I have received more compliments about my ST than any other bike I have owned.
 

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I have to echo some of Loki's sentiments here. I have an '05 Monster S2R that I am thrilled with. I've only had it 4 months, but it hasn't needed any unscheduled maintenance. I know that the service is cheaper for a 2-valve motor like mine, but I don't know by how much. The motor has been good for anything from freeway droning to riding a winding road. I can't tell you how it is 2-up, but I've found it to be both friendly and fun no matter what I ask of it.



One of the things that surprised me about Ducati when I was researching bikes was that they not only give hp and torque numbers for their bikes, they also give dyno readouts on their website for current model bikes. You may not be able to find a chart for an ST2, but you can certainly get one for an ST3 and any of the other 2-valve and 4-valve bikes they offer. Don't worry about the absolute numbers for this comparison, just look at the trend of the torque line. There are factors other than valve count that affect the 'flatness' of the curve, but you should be able to get a general impression about the difference this way. Of course the best solution is to actually ride them all, but sadly this can't always happen. I would have to guess that the 3-valve motor strikes a pretty good balance as the ST4 has been discontinued for '06.



Hope that helps.
 

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Hasn't the ST4 been discontinued? I do weekend work at a friend of mine's shop that sells Ducati, and I think I remember seeing that the ST4 was dropped. Anyway, even if it is still available, the ST3 is a better bang for the buck, IMO. We sold more ST3's than ST4's by a good margin.

BTW - Don't discount the Triumph Sprint ST...
 
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