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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I"m sorry, have not ridden the BMW. I do own 2002 VFR800 with ABS (god bless america or was that japan?)



I really enjoy the bike. My previous bike was a VTR1000. Sweet but unconfortable.



The VFR handles better, more comfortable, has a nice sounding engine and I got's the hard luggage.



Drawback. My friends luv the bike but if you do any two-up riding, I will criticize the engine.



Normally for one-up, very nice and peppy. But for two-up I feel the 4 banger is weak. You have to rev the engine up hills and..... when you hit 7000 rpm the engine howls and revs even crazier. Not very relaxing and that is what two-up is all about, comfort. Crap, the VTR's v-twin would have been a far better engine for this bike.



But, for one-up the engine sounds nice and it DOES scoot fairly well.



If you get this bike get the ABS and the Givi Hard Luggage.



Even though I've *****ed about this bike just now, I am very happy with it. I just don't take my wife riding anymore. I leave her home barefoot and pregnant and with a chastity built on. Ahhhh, now I feel good.
 

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I would get the VFR. It's newer, just as well built, more powerful, looks better, handles better, and narrower. It also doesn't have that crappy 'VTEC' nonsense, plus it does have that cool gear driven cam noise. BMW's are nice, but enjoy a sportier bike while your body is young enough.
 

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I used to own a '00 800 and I really loved the bike. It seemed a little heavy, but I was used to a CBR 600. I put a t-bros pipe on and it had a terrific growl and made really good power (~ 100 rwhp). Good stock seat and comfortable ergos for a sporty bike. If you really like speed and sport riding, the VFR is definately faster than a boxer and is also a good commuter.



I've ridden an S, GS, RT, and RS but not the R. All of the boxers seem to make about the same power although the newest are 1150 engines and make a little more. They are generally heavier and the seating position is much more upright, if that matters to you. The R is supposed to be pretty good in the right hands, but it lacks the clearance and power of a VFR 800.



It really depends on what you want most. They both are great bikes, but the insurance will be a lot less on the BMW.
 

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I've owned neither but ridden both. I liked the VFR as a sporty, yet comfortable, ride. I love the looks of the thing too. The motor is a marvel, just get someone else to work on it.



But, on longer hauls, I really liked the BMW. I'm 6- 1, short legged and longer trunked and the BMW offered me a very neutral riding position. I really enjoy working on BMWs. (Well, not enjoy as much as don't hate.) Looks-wise, you really have to like BMW's inner beauty because your buddies are gonna rib the hell out of you. I like the look but not many find it a thing of beauty. When all is said and done, I don't see a bad decision in either of them.



PS. That BMW will corner better than you will.
 

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I owned a '99 VFR for about a year but promptly sold it after demoing (and purchasing) a new R1100S. IMHO, the BMW simply has more character and a rock-solid feel. The ABS is also reassuring when you suddenly get caught in a hale storm. Check out the new R1150R, BMW currently has great deals going.
 

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I owned a 98 VFR800 and a 95 R1100R before that.



I gave up the R11 because I like having feeling in my hands while riding. I did like the way the R11 handled, though.



The VFR was a pleasure. Kept it for 3 years. Moved on when naked sport bikes came along (the FZ-1).



I would say the R11 is more comfy than the VFR, though the VFR is not bad at all. The engine in the VFR is I would say the nicest I have ever owned. Would love to see a more powerful version of that motor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ahhhh, I now see that he was shopping for a used 2000 VFR.



I think the V-Tec is only nonsense for two-up riding. For hot rodding I do feel it give a little extra-oomph at the high end as did an article from a British on-line magazine a read.



But in comparisons between the 2002 and 2001 VFR's , they both had pro and cons. So you can't go wrong with either.
 

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Yeah, both VFR's are great all-around bikes. I have read many places (including MO) that the new VTEC is only to appease the EPA by reducing pollutants, and that the power of the 2002 is identical to the 2001. I kind of liked the cam drive noise, but I admit I haven't heard the new engine as it passes 7000rpm. I have taken a serious look at both machines. Too much money for me though.
 

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I ride a VFR, Y2k. I've demoed an R1150R.



The BMW is definatly more convenient. For commuting, that is a big advantage with the bags and the shaft drive. However, I think you would probably be drier on the VFR in the rain (fairing on legs, decent windsceen).



The boxer buzz is annoying, the VFR has a little buzz above 5k RPM, the BMW a little more.



However, does the BMW have ABS? ABS is really nice (lock the front wheel once and you will understand).



Also, how hot does it get where you are? The VFR tends to get pretty hot in stop & go traffic (silly side mounted radiators).

 

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Second on the great deals...

BMW is running .9% on 2002, 1.9% on 2003 financing, for 48 or 60 months, with first 3 payments paid by BMW!

Thats very low financing, especially given the long term of the loans.
 

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Advice: 5 cents

I took a long hard look at the VFR800 before I bought my R1100SBX. If Honda had swapped the 800cc V-four for the 1000cc RC51 V-Twin, I would have had to buy it. But they didn't so that bike does not exist, yet. In my search for my ride, I found the R1100SBX and the R1150R. I almost bought the R1150R, but I wanted something sporty. Now after riding the R1100SBX on 650 mile/day trips, I think I should have given the R1150R a longer look. Don't get me wrong, I love my Boxer Cup, but it's more suited to Alpine touring that dealing w/ the interstate and I would say the same for the VFR. You stated that you want to commute, with occaisionally longer rides and occasional fun rides through the twisties. If your going to commute 80%, tour 10% and sport ride 10%, the answer is BMW and if you can afford it get an R1150R w/ABS. For serviceablility, BMW's are hard to beat. I never found lane splitting on BMW's to be a problem and I think you will be amazed at how well they take to the twisties. I would recommend the VFR if sport riding was your primary concern. BTW, I am 6' tall w/32" inseam and ergonomics are important to me too. Good luck and I'll see you on the road.
 

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The R 1100 R is a nice, upright bike for commuting, of which I've done quite a bit on it. It's also easy to maintain and very reliable. I ride it all year round except when there is snow on the ground. The center of gravity is low and the telelever front end keeps the tire in contact with the ground over some very rough pavement. The nice wide upright handlebars are also good at low speeds. I have very little experience with the VFR, but it does not strike me as quite as comfortable a commuter or as easy to handle at low speeds, though that could be because I am so used to the upright R. I am very satisfied with the BMW.
 

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There just isn't a bad choice here. As between these two machines, I'm afraid I'd have to go with whatever holds more garage appeal for you. Both interesting, both fast and comfortable and good handling and a whole lot more motorcycle than most of us will ever use, if we're being honest about it. I love VFRs in all of their iterations, but first in my heart are the old R90S airheads of the mid 70s, of which the R is a logical extension. If it were me, I'd probably go with the BMW just because I wouldn't see myself coming quite as frequently. I'd probably be more comfortable on it, too, although the VFR is as good in the ergos department as I believe any sportbike will ever be.



Whichever one you choose, you're going to be happy with it.
 

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I have a 00 VFR with about 32K miles. I test rode a R1150RT.

The RT handles well.

The RT's transmission is vague when compared to the VFR.

The VFR's motor spools up quickly which I think is a plus YMMV.



Bottom like - they're both great bikes.

It comes down to - do you want a boxer or a V4.



Mike



 

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I owned a '95 R1100R for a couple of years, then sold it to buy an '00 VFR, which I've had for two years now. My first non-BMW. The VFR is the better bike, but I still miss the BMW. VFR has better suspension, more power, less vibration, and smoother airflow at speed (less helmet buffeting). VFR also gets better mileage, and on regular gas - not premium. Being 5'8'', I even found the VFR more comfortable for distances, mostly due to the better suspension (for my light weight) and smoother motor. The BMW handled better, for my taste, and made its speed in a more relaxed manner. Going the same speed on both bikes in the tight stuff, the BMW will feel more relaxed.

I much prefer the BMW switchgear, despite all the magazine complaints, and the BMW paint and finish quality will probably stand up better over time. Both transmissions are fine, but I prefer the feel of the BMW's.

The BMW "surging" really does affect a number of bikes. It affected both the Oilheads that I've owned; and it's every bit as annoying as people say. No surging on the VFR.

I'm glad I made the switch to the VFR, but if I could afford one of the new dual-plug Oilheads - which, presumably, don't surge - then I would gladly go back to BMW.

The lack of luggage on the VFR is an easy fix from GIVI. But it's true that it's not a good bike for passengers. Not much legroom for them, and that's not so easily changed.
 

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Quick comment on the servicability of both. Yes the shaft drive BMW will be less maintence than the chain drive VFR, and yes, it is easier to work on the BMW, "but" the good news is you won't work on the VFR as much either, and Honda dealers don't charge as much for a full service (which isn't due until 16,000 miles!) than all those BMW dealers, of course assuming that you will be having the dealer due your servicing for you like 90% of most owners. You will have already have done two full services and almost ready for number three when the Honda comes due. Think about it! Ciao.

 

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The 2002 VFR is a great bike but IMHO any 90-01 VFR is better. They have gear-driven cams and don't have that stupid, useless, POS Hyper-VTEC.



Get a VFR but get an 01 or earlier.
 

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Both bikes will be reliable, but how much effort and riding are you wanting to put in? For a bike for the long haul that will stand up for years and still be respectable, the BMW is the only choice. A VFR is a wonderful bike, with a motor like a rheostat, but I wouldn't want it for years on end. I have ridden both (well, an r1150R), and settled on the Beemer.
 

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I can only advise on the R1100R, I have a 99. Regarding lane-splitting, if I can do it in Tokyo, it shouldn't be a problem in the states. It's great for tall riders, I'm 6'2". Get one with ABS and heated grips -- I've found that these options don't add much to the cost in the used market, but make a great bike even better. ABS is a $2K option on a new BMW!

My bike doesn't have a surging problem--or if it does I don't notice it. Boxers vibrate more than Japanese 4s at idle, but not a lot more at speed.



Biggest gripe -- the huge, heavy, ugly exhaust/CAT. Try to find a roadster that has already been fitted with a proper pipe and save yourself $600.
 

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If comfort and 2-up riding is more important to you than sportsriding and cost of ownership, go for the BMW. The Beemer is definitely more expensive in the long run (say 30%), but your wife will love it. As to the comment on longevity I read: my 1998 VFR has clocked 60.000 miles now and the valves never needed adjustment up to now! It still looks as good as 5 years ago as well.
 
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