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Drunk Packer Fans

Wow, now drunk Packer Fans will fall in the frozen lake up der' after trying to clear 500 yds of open-water instead of the old record of only 450.

Go Bret Fav..ra

Seriously though, that's a nice looking sled.
 

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Record?

I didn't knew about that, all I know is that one of my buddy who has been doing the Harricana rally did one run on the St-Lawrence river here, from a small island to the shore, something just around 1 mile, in the summer of 2000. His two partner didn't fare as well, following in his wake: both did have to swim a bit...
 

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That is the coolest snowmobile I have ever seen! I've ridden some fun machines, but one with an R1 engine? Whoa. I volunteer to test one for you, MO, heh heh heh!
 

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How many HP does the most powerful stock 2-stroke snowmobile make? Isn't there an Arctic Cat 800 or something that is the fastest out there? How would this Yamaha do against the fastest stock 2-stroke? I'm snowmobile ignorant, but interested. Fill me in!



 

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How many HP does the most powerful stock 2-stroke snowmobile make? Isn't there an Arctic Cat 800 or something that is the fastest out there? How would this Yamaha do against the fastest stock 2-stroke? I'm snowmobile ignorant, but interested. Fill me in!



 

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The Toad
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I'm ready for a 4-stroke snowmobile, if they can keep the weight manageable. The broader torque band would be very welcome for pulling a trailer full of gear. The two strokes seem to lug too hard due to the peaky powerband.
 

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Yeah, that's great.......

It's an interesting novelty, with the R1 engine and everything, but until they drop some serious weight and give it a proper chassis, it isn't much use to the slednecks of the world. Yamaha has been adding little tricks and novelty items to their sleds lately, yet ignoring the fact that their sleds come in dead last in the suspension category in virtually every test. I would love to park a Yamaha sled next to my R1, but until they get their act together and make a decent snocross chassis, I'll have to stick with my MXZ or an Arctic Cat's sno-pro. Polaris has shown potential with their Pro-X, but you still can't buy one other than a fan-cooled 440.

Frankly, for those of us who like to really ride snowmobiles (as opposed to putzing down the trail with trailer in tow) we really don't care that much about the motor. Power is nice to have, for sure, but without the suspension, you can't really have fun. Blitzing across a lake gets old real quick.

www.slednecks.com
 

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Most powerful sled

Arctic Cat makes a 1000cc 2-stroke motor that they put in both trail and mountain sleds. Bone-stock, the horsepower is in the 170 range, 174, if I remember correctly.

I would suspect that with the extra weight that this Yamaha carries around would seriously hamper it's speed. I think the 800cc twin trail sleds (A/C ZR800, Polaris 800XCSP, S/D MXZ800) would all probably wax this Yamaha in any kind of race. Their horsepower numbers are all in the 140 range as well, and they probably weigh at least 50 pounds less. The 600 or 700cc version of these might be the more even race. Then there are the muscle sleds, the XCR800, the MachZ800, and the Arctic Cat 1000. These are all much, much faster.
 

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I'm actually not sure if you HAVE to wear one... but you WANT to wear one. Trust me.



As far as the RX-1... it's neat, but useless to me. I like yamaha as a brand (i own and LOVE an R6) but their mountain sleds pretty much suck. I've never seen one, stock or modified that was anywhere near the Polaris RMK's that we ride.



I'm not sure there will ever be (well ok, maybe eventually, but no time soon) a 4-stroke snowmobile with the same power to wieght ratio as the current two cylinder 2 strokes. Maybe if the entire snowmobile was built of carbon fiber and titanium, but that would be outrageously priced and the same could be done to a 2 stroke to get even lower weight.

 

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Re: Most powerful sled

I'm not so sure this wouldn't compete with the big two strokers. From what I've read, it weighs just a little more than their previous muscle sled the "SRX 700" I have heard plenty about this 700 beating or keeping up with other 800's. This thing is also "supposed" to have something like 68% more low end torque than the big two strokers. I also bet it ends up weighing less than Arctic Cat's 1000cc pig. This is all just pure speculation, but I have high hopes for this thing, even if I have been a loyal Polaris fan in the past.
 

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Re: Weight and power

The most powerful machine out there is the Arctic Cat Thundercat (2-stroke 1000 triple/triple), which makes 172 hp). However this is probably a good 50 lb heavier than the RX-1.

Yahama claims the RX1 weighs a few pounds less than the SRX triple triple (3 cylinders 3 pipes). The center of gravity they claim is fractionally lower and 2 inches further back (a major problem with the Arctic Cat 4-stroke I rented in Yellowstone). As the SRX is still one of the flatter-cornering sleds out there, this is excellent.

The weight is about 30 - 55 lb heavier than the competition 800 twins, if they were fitted with electric start. Putting a few gallons less in the tank (easy with better fuel consumption), and you could make a lot of ground up, especially as fuel is carried up high.

Yes, the competition 800s make 135 to 140 hp, but that is with optimal jetting, which is affected by altitude and temperature and the time of the day. Yam are also claiming 65% more low-rpm torque.

The current 700 Yammie Viper is a very competitive machine (some magazines rated it sled of the year), and the SRX still often gets a top-10 nomination, despite being virtually unchanged for years. The rear Pro-Action suspension still gets very good reviews, and the front-end on this machine has been totally redesigned, so that will hopefully bring the machine up to par with the competition.

Add to that Yahama's acknowledged best-in-class build quality, warranty and 4-stroke reliability and low maintenance, and I think they have a very compelling machine.

For me, I think I am going to replace my 700 XTC triple with one of these: little pollution and noise(yes, we are in danger of losing a lot of good riding areas because of 2-smoke noise and pollution), controls and layout, quality and warranty (my 700 has been totally reliable).

Better tank range means I don't have to spend anxious moments wondering if I am going to make the next gas stop. On the fun side, the lower center of gravity, superior trail power characteristics (low end torque is much more useful on the trail than top-end). The torque and clutch changes will hopefully overcome the notoriously conservative Yammie clutching of the past.

Arguably it has a class leading front suspension design, superior electrics and lights (I _really_ like good lights: some of the best riding is at night) to plug in radar detector, electric helmet shield, cell phone, suit, cat's pajamas and so on is great.

This is a great first try at a 4-stroke. There is a bunch of new stuff in this sled besides the motor, and it is all designed in from the start, unlike the doggy, slow, tippy Arctic Cat and Polaris 4-strokes.

If the greenies and EPA have their way, we will be lucky to be allowed to ride sleds at all. In fact, there is a strong possibility that Yellowstone NP and other areas will be 4-stroke only next year. Which would you rather ride: this or the 50hp / 600 lb / high-COG Cat?

In fact, I have a serious case of new sled lust starting right about now. Winter 2002 / 2003 is too far away....
 

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Differn't strokes fer differn't folks

None of these things are very important to myself and the guys I ride with. Much more important than high power, clean exhaust, reverse, and electric hookups is a great chassis and suspension with as much travel as possible. And LOW WEIGHT. The only *real* sleds to consider right now are the Ski-Doo MXZ-X, the Polaris Pro-X, and Arctic Cat's ZR Sno-Pro or their EFI ZR600 and 800 Cross-Country. Give us long travel, tilted tunnels, wide running boards with lots of grip, and high, straight snowcross handlebars. Reverse? Too heavy (except for Ski-Doo's great RER.) Electric face shields? No way---motocross helmets are way better. Lights? Who rides at night? You can't see your landings. Too risky.
 

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Not too sure about all states, but it's not legally enforced in New Hampshire for folks over 18.



However everybody does wear one, at least for comfort (try riding bare-headed in -20F).



Also, snowmobiling is an inherently riskier sport than motorcycling.

Typical trails are run through the woods on rights-of-way or game trails, or strung out along logging roads through the mountains. When you hit a straight of a few hundred feet, most sleds can blast up to 80 - 100 mph in seconds. This can lead to interesting closing speeds on popular trails.



Add to the mix 100 - 170 hp, 500lb machine. Stir in automatic clutches which almost immediately dial in max power.

Cook on a few feet of snow, slush, ice, rocks, and whatever else adds to the fuel, and you can see the inherent fun, and risk...
 
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