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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I liked the WR426, but I chose the XR650R as my bike of choice. Why? Well the XR was cheaper to buy than the WR. Not sure if it's like that all over, but here it was cheaper by a few hundred bucks. My riding invloves quite a bit of open, cross-country riding, (no bush-tigh trails here), and the XR smokes the WR for top-end. Period. With a top speed over 100mph, the XR covers the open spaces quicker than anything (not sure about the new KTM 520EXC though..). And, when track days come, throw on some different rubber, and you have an instant motard weapon. Couple this with the renowned XR durability, and it was an easy choice. Don't get me wrong, the WR is fantastic, (I've ridden a few of them), but the XR was better for my budget, and type of riding......
 

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Item 1: Factory street legal dual sports are hampered by the US DOT and EPA. You'll gain 20 lbs, lose 20% power and lose suspension quality. It will cost you >$1200 to get it all back. Buy a dirt only bike and go to www.bajadesigns.com.

Item 2: Better pictures please.

Item 3: Technical info (actual weight and dyno curve) please.

Item 4: Yamaha is smart to give you guys a Left Coast setup, but it would be good to offer a low cost way of tuning the bike for everywhere else. Here in Houston (and everything within 200 miles), we have very tight trails. Desert racing is a far off dream. It ain't just New England that it tight and technical.

Item 5: Given the cost and unavailability of the KTM boomers, I want a Yamathump.
 

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Here's an ignorant question

Um...I'm going to sound stupid here, but here goes.

So I can tell that there are two genres of dirtbikes, one which the YZ426 represents and one that the WR426 represents. Having only ridden dedicated street machines before, could someone explain the differences? What is each genre designed for? Are both types used for off-road racing, or only one? What are the primary differences between the two genres and why?

I apologise again for my ignorance,

starvingstudent
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: Here

The YZ's are for closed-course motocross racing. The have tighter gearing, and the power delivery is more abrubt and they are a touch lighter. The WR (wide ratio) has a wide ratio-gearing, larger tank, and heavier fly-weight for more controllable power. It is used for just about anything but closed course racing. Cross-country, woods riding, trail-riding or a fun off-road play bike. Hope this helps...
 

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Yamaha has done a fine job with the WR426, but most any Euro enduro could have it's way with it. Right now, the Husaberg(maybe KTM) is the enduro to have but once the Cannondale enduro makes it's way into showrooms the competition will have to play some serious catchup!
 

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Re: Here

Take a GSXR-750. Rip off all street stuff. Remove the sidestand and lights. Put on a hideously loud race only exhaust. Revalve the suspension for smooth racetracks. Take off the flywheel weight and lighting coil so the engine spins super fast but stalls easily.

The stock Gixx is like the WR, the modified one is like the YZ.

Anyway, if you are mechanically inclined, buy a used dirt bike. My olf KTM cost about $1300 three years ago and should fetch $1000+ this spring when I sell it to buy a new one. I bought it to see if I like dirt riding. Mission Accomplished - I love it.
 

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The problem is simple: Cannondale tried to do a helluva a lot of fabulous new engineering. This is always difficult and super tough for an outfit who has no experience in building motos.



Look at the YZ400. What was new for Yamaha? Frame? No, that's almost exactly a YZ250 item. Ditto suspension and all the other bits. Gearbox? Not really, they've made many others. Five valve head? Not at all. High revving four stroke? R!, anybody? They just put together all their existant corporate knowledge in a slightly different configuration. It is a great machine and a landmark, but they also had most of the pieces in place.



About the WR, the only thing that worries me is its constant issue with nimbleness. I live in Houston, so I have tight woods to deal with. Any other tight woods riders out there have comments about it compared to an XR or KTM300?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was in very tight woods with my XR650R. The WR is easier to ride in the tight stuff, but not by much. However, the KTM380 was easier than both of them...although it's not a 4-stroke....just my observations.....
 

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Re: Here

The Wr is heavier, bigger tank, 18 vs. 19 inch rear wheel, throttle stop, lighting coil , more flywheel, different exhaust (ie spark arrester) the timing is different (smoother,less abrupt)has an o-ring chain.I wish my YZ 426 had all theses traits except for the timing and weight difference. Next time I'll buy the WR, re-time it,cut the throttle stop off, put on a DSP Ti pipe and soften it up. Its too bad there so dam tall though....
 

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I have a YZ426 and had it revalved, added rally hand gaurds, Renthal Bars. It has the motor I want but wish it had a 18" rear, bigger tank, some flywheel weight and possibly a light. Whats this ? Sounds like a WR426. Yep, buy a WR and change the timing and chop the throttle stop, put on a DSP Ti pipe and soften it up and I think thats what everyone really wants. And, hey Yamaha how about a bike for midgets like me (5'7") These four strokes from the tuning fork Co. are truly great.
 

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Why do MO say that Yamaha raises the bar?

The only thumpers that I personally think are good enduro race bikes with minor modifications are Husabergs and KTM rfs. Sure the require more maintenance, but if you are a racer that's part of the package. The Yamaha is to bulky, top heavy and if you twist the trottle by mistake, you'll have kick you self blue (just like the bike) and loose precious seconds in a race. The WR is heavier without electric start than KTM and Husabergs are with, that's not very high tech is it? If you look in the results of the World Championships in enduro you won't find many WR400's, and now when the new bike is 426cc I don't even know if there is a class for it as the big thumpers are +500cc.
 

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Re: Here

Definitely try the dirt! I'm primarily a street rider but managed to pick up a (don't laugh!) '83 XL500 (500cc single street legal off road bike - rather old and heavy though) for really cheap. Man, what a hoot. The first time I left the ground off a hill(unexpectedly actually) the grins started and have never stopped.

You can actually practice big wheelies, power slides, jumps and all that without risking death. Well, for most of the guys who read this, that's prob not true as they're going way faster than me but, for a dirt newbie, it's a royal hoot.

The other thing for me is riding the thing on the street is a complete giggle. On the GSXR everyone wants to race (cars, bikes, trucks) and sometimes you just want to ride your own way. On the XL there is no preconceived notion that you're a squid however, the things got HUGE torque, big gooshie suspension and is a complete blast around town!

These dirt guys have really got a good thing going. Try it out!
 

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Re: Tall Wr

Hi Hamrhd,

I am seriously consdering a 2001 WR426. I sat on one in a dealers showroom and had a really hard time touching the floor. I am about 5'7"-5'8" with boots. I really want to purchase the WR, but the problem with my feet touching the ground concerns me...is there a way to "lower" the WR426?

Thanks,

Tony
 

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Around where I live, it's mostly tighter trails. The WR 426 has a huge amount of motor. And it must feel pretty heavy to the rider, because the guys around here are always staying out of the woods and sticking to the open areas challenging themselves to drag races. They might as well get personal watercraft since that's what they are using their WR's for. (Full throttle one way, then turn around and, full throttle the other...) One rather telling comment in the article stood out to me, "A bit of muscle is required to get the bike laid over and turning, so we often found ourselves taking a wider, sweeping line instead of staying tight." This, plus watching the owners of these bikes stay off the trails, has convinced me to go with the better handling and considerably cheaper KLX 300 for my trail work. Great article. Enjoyed it.



-Markster
 

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Ack....A KLX over a WR.....???



I have a YZ400f, and owned a KLX650. I feel like I traded in a school bus for a Porsche. I realize that the KLX300 is not as huge as the 650, but do yourself a favor and try a YZ/WR. I wish I had leaned this direction 10 years ago...All the power you need, all the suspension you need, and easily the best handling bike I have owned ( XR500R/XR650L/KLX650). I ride in SE Michigan and NW Ohio, and the trails can be tight here as well. I love my YZ.

 
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